Investigating the use of mobile technology to promote active lifestyles and improved glycaemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis

Abstract

The purpose of this thesis was to examine the potential of using mobile technology to promote active lifestyles and improved glycaemic control in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Chapter 1 introduced the research area, thesis rationale, and the design and structure of the thesis. Five studies were undertaken as part of this thesis. This first (Chapter 2) was a systematic and integrated literature review examining the effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of using mobile technology to promote active living in adults with Type 2 Diabetes. The second (Chapter 3) presented the challenges and solutions of combining glucose and activity data sets measured continuously using mobile technology. The third (Chapter 4) examined the physical activity, sedentary behaviour and glucose patterns of adults with Type 2 diabetes in a free-living setting using mobile technology. The fourth (Chapter 5) examined the individual glycaemic response in adults with Type 2 Diabetes to interrupting prolonged sedentary behaviour in a controlled setting. Study five (Chapter 6) explored the experiences of, and attitudes towards, using mobile technologies to promote active living in adults with Type 2 diabetes. The final chapter (Chapter 7) discussed the findings of these studies in the wider context of the thesis and how the findings can be used to positively impact diabetes care and future research.
Date of Award1 Oct 2017
LanguageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University Of Strathclyde
SponsorsUniversity of Strathclyde
SupervisorAlison Kirk (Supervisor) & Allan Hewitt (Supervisor)

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