Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study

Kirsty Hughes, Anne Marie MacKintosh, G Hastings, C Wheeler, J Watson, J Inglis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the appeal of "designer drinks" to young people.

DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative research comprising group discussions and questionnaire led interviews with young people accompanied by a self completion questionnaire.

SETTINGS: Argyll and Clyde Health Board area, west Scotland.

SUBJECTS: Eight groups aged 12-17 years; 824 aged 12-17 recruited by multistage cluster probability sample from the community health index.

RESULTS: Young people were familiar with designer drinks, especially MD 20/20 and leading brands of strong white cider. Attitudes towards these drinks varied quite distinctly with age, clearly reflecting their attitudes towards and motivations for drinking in general. The brand imagery of designer drinks-in contrast with that of more mainstream drinks-matched many 14 and 15 year olds' perceptions and expectations of drinking. Popularity of designer drinks peaked between the ages of 13 and 16 while more conventional drinks showed a consistent increase in popularity with age. Consumption of designer drinks tended to be in less controlled circumstances and was associated with heavier alcohol intake and greater drunkenness.

CONCLUSIONS: Designer drinks are a cause for concern. They appeal to young people, often more so than conventional drinks, and are particularly attractive to 14-16 year olds. Consumption of designer drinks is also associated with drinking in less controlled environments, heavier drinking, and greater drunkenness. There is a need for policy debate to assess the desirability of these drinks and the extent to which further controls on their marketing are required.

LanguageEnglish
Pages414-418
Number of pages5
JournalBMJ
Volume314
Issue number7078
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 1997

Fingerprint

Drinking
alcohol
Alcohols
Alcoholic Intoxication
popularity
appeal
Controlled Environment
Sampling Studies
Ego
questionnaire
Qualitative Research
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Health
Scotland
quantitative research
Marketing
health
group discussion
qualitative research
Motivation

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • adolescent behavior
  • alcohol drinking
  • alcoholic beverages
  • attitude to health
  • child
  • choice behavior
  • female
  • humans
  • male
  • motivation
  • Scotland

Cite this

Hughes, K., MacKintosh, A. M., Hastings, G., Wheeler, C., Watson, J., & Inglis, J. (1997). Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study. BMJ, 314(7078 ), 414-418. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.314.7078.414
Hughes, Kirsty ; MacKintosh, Anne Marie ; Hastings, G ; Wheeler, C ; Watson, J ; Inglis, J. / Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks : quantitative and qualitative study. In: BMJ. 1997 ; Vol. 314, No. 7078 . pp. 414-418.
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Hughes, K, MacKintosh, AM, Hastings, G, Wheeler, C, Watson, J & Inglis, J 1997, 'Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study' BMJ, vol. 314, no. 7078 , pp. 414-418. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.314.7078.414

Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks : quantitative and qualitative study. / Hughes, Kirsty; MacKintosh, Anne Marie; Hastings, G; Wheeler, C; Watson, J; Inglis, J.

In: BMJ, Vol. 314, No. 7078 , 08.02.1997, p. 414-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks

T2 - BMJ

AU - Hughes, Kirsty

AU - MacKintosh, Anne Marie

AU - Hastings, G

AU - Wheeler, C

AU - Watson, J

AU - Inglis, J

PY - 1997/2/8

Y1 - 1997/2/8

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the appeal of "designer drinks" to young people.DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative research comprising group discussions and questionnaire led interviews with young people accompanied by a self completion questionnaire.SETTINGS: Argyll and Clyde Health Board area, west Scotland.SUBJECTS: Eight groups aged 12-17 years; 824 aged 12-17 recruited by multistage cluster probability sample from the community health index.RESULTS: Young people were familiar with designer drinks, especially MD 20/20 and leading brands of strong white cider. Attitudes towards these drinks varied quite distinctly with age, clearly reflecting their attitudes towards and motivations for drinking in general. The brand imagery of designer drinks-in contrast with that of more mainstream drinks-matched many 14 and 15 year olds' perceptions and expectations of drinking. Popularity of designer drinks peaked between the ages of 13 and 16 while more conventional drinks showed a consistent increase in popularity with age. Consumption of designer drinks tended to be in less controlled circumstances and was associated with heavier alcohol intake and greater drunkenness.CONCLUSIONS: Designer drinks are a cause for concern. They appeal to young people, often more so than conventional drinks, and are particularly attractive to 14-16 year olds. Consumption of designer drinks is also associated with drinking in less controlled environments, heavier drinking, and greater drunkenness. There is a need for policy debate to assess the desirability of these drinks and the extent to which further controls on their marketing are required.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the appeal of "designer drinks" to young people.DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative research comprising group discussions and questionnaire led interviews with young people accompanied by a self completion questionnaire.SETTINGS: Argyll and Clyde Health Board area, west Scotland.SUBJECTS: Eight groups aged 12-17 years; 824 aged 12-17 recruited by multistage cluster probability sample from the community health index.RESULTS: Young people were familiar with designer drinks, especially MD 20/20 and leading brands of strong white cider. Attitudes towards these drinks varied quite distinctly with age, clearly reflecting their attitudes towards and motivations for drinking in general. The brand imagery of designer drinks-in contrast with that of more mainstream drinks-matched many 14 and 15 year olds' perceptions and expectations of drinking. Popularity of designer drinks peaked between the ages of 13 and 16 while more conventional drinks showed a consistent increase in popularity with age. Consumption of designer drinks tended to be in less controlled circumstances and was associated with heavier alcohol intake and greater drunkenness.CONCLUSIONS: Designer drinks are a cause for concern. They appeal to young people, often more so than conventional drinks, and are particularly attractive to 14-16 year olds. Consumption of designer drinks is also associated with drinking in less controlled environments, heavier drinking, and greater drunkenness. There is a need for policy debate to assess the desirability of these drinks and the extent to which further controls on their marketing are required.

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KW - adolescent behavior

KW - alcohol drinking

KW - alcoholic beverages

KW - attitude to health

KW - child

KW - choice behavior

KW - female

KW - humans

KW - male

KW - motivation

KW - Scotland

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DO - 10.1136/bmj.314.7078.414

M3 - Article

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EP - 418

JO - BMJ

JF - BMJ

SN - 0959-8138

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ER -

Hughes K, MacKintosh AM, Hastings G, Wheeler C, Watson J, Inglis J. Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study. BMJ. 1997 Feb 8;314(7078 ):414-418. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.314.7078.414