Wound moisture tracking in the presence of antibacterial honey and during topical negative pressure therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Unnecessary dressing changes during military operations in the hospital or at home compromise healing and may increase the risk of local infection. In this article, we describe a medical device that allows the control of moisture in the wound without having to change the dressing. We describe the results of two clinical studies. In the first, the moisture level of the injury is monitored during treatment with compression, with the application of medical honey ( Medihoney ™ Antibacterial Medical Honey ™ , Comvita ) , practiced in hospitals in Glasgow (NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde ) and Jeddah (King Abdullazziz University Hospital). The first results of a second study involve monitoring of moisture levels of injury during a negative pressure therapy ( NPWT ) . The purpose of these studies is to determine whether you get a good level of moisture in the dressings for wound healing, and to evaluate the adequacy of monitoring the moisture level in the dressing using a disposable sensor CE marked as a medical device.
LanguageEnglish
Pages25-29
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Review of the Armed Forces Medical Services
Volume86
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Honey
Bandages
Wounds and Injuries
Equipment and Supplies
Wound Healing
Pressure
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • military medicine
  • negative pressure therapy
  • biomedical engineering
  • moisture levels

Cite this

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title = "Wound moisture tracking in the presence of antibacterial honey and during topical negative pressure therapy",
abstract = "Unnecessary dressing changes during military operations in the hospital or at home compromise healing and may increase the risk of local infection. In this article, we describe a medical device that allows the control of moisture in the wound without having to change the dressing. We describe the results of two clinical studies. In the first, the moisture level of the injury is monitored during treatment with compression, with the application of medical honey ( Medihoney ™ Antibacterial Medical Honey ™ , Comvita ) , practiced in hospitals in Glasgow (NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde ) and Jeddah (King Abdullazziz University Hospital). The first results of a second study involve monitoring of moisture levels of injury during a negative pressure therapy ( NPWT ) . The purpose of these studies is to determine whether you get a good level of moisture in the dressings for wound healing, and to evaluate the adequacy of monitoring the moisture level in the dressing using a disposable sensor CE marked as a medical device.",
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AB - Unnecessary dressing changes during military operations in the hospital or at home compromise healing and may increase the risk of local infection. In this article, we describe a medical device that allows the control of moisture in the wound without having to change the dressing. We describe the results of two clinical studies. In the first, the moisture level of the injury is monitored during treatment with compression, with the application of medical honey ( Medihoney ™ Antibacterial Medical Honey ™ , Comvita ) , practiced in hospitals in Glasgow (NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde ) and Jeddah (King Abdullazziz University Hospital). The first results of a second study involve monitoring of moisture levels of injury during a negative pressure therapy ( NPWT ) . The purpose of these studies is to determine whether you get a good level of moisture in the dressings for wound healing, and to evaluate the adequacy of monitoring the moisture level in the dressing using a disposable sensor CE marked as a medical device.

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