Women's voice pitch is negatively correlated with health risk factors

Jovana Vukovic, David R. Feinberg, Lisa Debruine, Finlay G. Smith, Benedict C. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that men prefer women's voices with relatively high pitch to those with low pitch, suggesting that men may use voice pitch as a cue of women's mate quality. However, evidence that voice pitch is a cue to women's long-term health is equivocal. Here we present evidence that women's average speaking voice pitch is negatively correlated with a health risk index derived from principle component analysis of various body measurements that are known to predict long-term health outcomes in women (weight, body mass index, percentage body fat, waist and hip circumference, and waist-hip ratio). Our results suggest that voice pitch is a cue to women's long-term health, supporting mate-choice accounts of men's preferences for raised pitch in women's voices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-225
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Psychology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010

Keywords

  • attractiveness
  • femininity
  • fundamental frequency
  • mate choice
  • voice pitch

Cite this

Vukovic, J., Feinberg, D. R., Debruine, L., Smith, F. G., & Jones, B. C. (2010). Women's voice pitch is negatively correlated with health risk factors. Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 8(3), 217-225. https://doi.org/10.1556/JEP.8.2010.3.2