Why do adolescents self-harm? An investigation of motives in a community sample

Susan Rasmussen, Keith Hawton, Sion Philpott-Morgan, Rory O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given the high rates of self-harm among adolescents, recent research has focussed on a better understanding of the motives for the behaviour. The present study had three aims: to investigate (i) which motives are most frequently endorsed by adolescents who report self-harm; (ii) whether motives reported at baseline predict repetition of self-harm over a 6 month period; and (iii) whether self- harm motives differ between boys and girls. 987 school pupils aged 14-16 years completed a lifestyle and coping questionnaire at two time points 6 months apart that recorded self-harm and the associated motives. The motive "to get relief from a terrible state of mind" was the most commonly endorsed reason for self-harm (in boys and girls). Interpersonal reasons (e.g. "to frighten someone") were least commonly endorsed. Regression analyses showed that adolescents who endorsed "wanting to get relief from a terrible state of mind" at baseline were significantly more likely to repeat self-harm at follow-up than those adolescents who did not cite this motive. The results highlight the complex nature of self-harm. They have implications for mental health provision in educational settings, especially in relation to encouraging regulation of emotions and help-seeking.
LanguageEnglish
JournalCrisis - The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Early online date2 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Feb 2016

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Pupil
Self Report
Life Style
Mental Health
Emotions
Regression Analysis
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • self harm
  • reasons
  • motives
  • adolescent
  • repetition

Cite this

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Why do adolescents self-harm? An investigation of motives in a community sample. / Rasmussen, Susan; Hawton, Keith; Philpott-Morgan, Sion; O'Connor, Rory.

In: Crisis - The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 02.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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