Who wants to learn forever? Hyperbole and difficulty with lifelong learning

John Halliday

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper addresses the issue of how lifelong learning, globalisation and capitalism are related within late modernity. It is critical of the argument that there is now an increasingly homogenous global economy that is knowledge based and that unambiguously requires a high level of cognitive skills in its workers. The idea that globalisation produces such rapid changes in the world of work that learning must be ongoing to cope with it is challenged. It is argued that the key issue for policy-makers concerned to encourage lifelong learning is funding the provision of those learning opportunities that would otherwise not be available. People can learn many worthwhile things at work, at home and elsewhere in informal associations. It makes little sense to duplicate the opportunity to learn those things formally or even in many cases, formally to distinguish such learning from living and working.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)195-210
    Number of pages15
    JournalStudies in Philosophy and Education
    Volume22
    Issue number3-4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2003

    Fingerprint

    lifelong learning
    work at home
    globalization
    learning
    working-day world
    modernity
    capitalist society
    funding
    worker
    economy
    knowledge
    Hyperbole
    Life Long Learning
    Globalization

    Keywords

    • economics
    • epistemology
    • globalisation
    • lifelong learning
    • modernity
    • performativity
    • values
    • work

    Cite this

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    Who wants to learn forever? Hyperbole and difficulty with lifelong learning. / Halliday, John.

    In: Studies in Philosophy and Education, Vol. 22, No. 3-4, 05.2003, p. 195-210.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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