Who Ultimately Pays for the Electricity Network Upgrade for EVs? [Research Briefing]

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

The UK and Scottish Governments have set ambitious targets for the roll out of electric vehicles (EVs). The predicted rapid expansion in EV ownership over the next couple of decades will see a shift in demand away from petrol and diesel fuels and towards electricity. The mass roll out of EVs is likely to require upgrades to the electricity network itself, which will carry significant costs. The Centre for Energy Policy is partnering with SP Energy Networks in a National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) project that integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

electric vehicle
Electric vehicles
electricity
Electricity
energy
Energy policy
economic system
energy policy
Diesel fuels
cost
ownership
Costs
Economics
modeling

Keywords

  • electricity network
  • electric vehicles
  • EVs
  • energy supply
  • economics

Cite this

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title = "Who Ultimately Pays for the Electricity Network Upgrade for EVs? [Research Briefing]",
abstract = "The UK and Scottish Governments have set ambitious targets for the roll out of electric vehicles (EVs). The predicted rapid expansion in EV ownership over the next couple of decades will see a shift in demand away from petrol and diesel fuels and towards electricity. The mass roll out of EVs is likely to require upgrades to the electricity network itself, which will carry significant costs. The Centre for Energy Policy is partnering with SP Energy Networks in a National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) project that integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs.",
keywords = "electricity network, electric vehicles, EVs, energy supply, economics",
author = "Karen Turner and Oluwafisayo Alabi and Christian Calvillo and Ragne Low",
note = "A 'research briefing' published by the University of Strathclyde's Centre for Energy Policy, as part of the International Public Policy Institute (IPPI).",
year = "2019",
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Who Ultimately Pays for the Electricity Network Upgrade for EVs? [Research Briefing]. / Turner, Karen; Alabi, Oluwafisayo; Calvillo, Christian; Low, Ragne.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2019. 1 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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AU - Alabi, Oluwafisayo

AU - Calvillo, Christian

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AB - The UK and Scottish Governments have set ambitious targets for the roll out of electric vehicles (EVs). The predicted rapid expansion in EV ownership over the next couple of decades will see a shift in demand away from petrol and diesel fuels and towards electricity. The mass roll out of EVs is likely to require upgrades to the electricity network itself, which will carry significant costs. The Centre for Energy Policy is partnering with SP Energy Networks in a National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) project that integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs.

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KW - energy supply

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