Who follows whom?: The impact of parties on media agenda formation in the 1997 British general election campaign

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study provides a first step toward filling a gap in our understanding of the sources of issue salience and of the ability of political actors to manipulate the dimensions of social choice. It investigates how daily issue agendas of political parties and the news media (press and television) affected each other during the 1997 U.K. general election campaign. Using a time-series cross-section design (including data on nine different policy dimensions), ordinary least squares regressions with panel-corrected standard errors show that TV news broadcasts responded systematically to preceding issue selection by both the Labour party and the Conservatives. While the press seemed to respond predominantly to stimuli by the Conservatives, none of the parties were influenced in their agenda choices by any of the media outlets.
LanguageEnglish
Pages34-54
Number of pages21
JournalHarvard International Journal of Press-Politics
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

election campaign
Television
Time series
news
Personnel
Labour Party
political actor
broadcast
time series
television
stimulus
regression
ability

Keywords

  • general election
  • media
  • issue salience

Cite this

@article{c2a205a96ed14f4d81195ec746dbd1f6,
title = "Who follows whom?: The impact of parties on media agenda formation in the 1997 British general election campaign",
abstract = "This study provides a first step toward filling a gap in our understanding of the sources of issue salience and of the ability of political actors to manipulate the dimensions of social choice. It investigates how daily issue agendas of political parties and the news media (press and television) affected each other during the 1997 U.K. general election campaign. Using a time-series cross-section design (including data on nine different policy dimensions), ordinary least squares regressions with panel-corrected standard errors show that TV news broadcasts responded systematically to preceding issue selection by both the Labour party and the Conservatives. While the press seemed to respond predominantly to stimuli by the Conservatives, none of the parties were influenced in their agenda choices by any of the media outlets.",
keywords = "general election, media, issue salience",
author = "Heinz Brandenburg",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1177/1081180X0200700303",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "34--54",
journal = "Harvard International Journal of Press-Politics",
issn = "1081-180X",
publisher = "MIT Press Journals",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Who follows whom?

T2 - Harvard International Journal of Press-Politics

AU - Brandenburg, Heinz

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - This study provides a first step toward filling a gap in our understanding of the sources of issue salience and of the ability of political actors to manipulate the dimensions of social choice. It investigates how daily issue agendas of political parties and the news media (press and television) affected each other during the 1997 U.K. general election campaign. Using a time-series cross-section design (including data on nine different policy dimensions), ordinary least squares regressions with panel-corrected standard errors show that TV news broadcasts responded systematically to preceding issue selection by both the Labour party and the Conservatives. While the press seemed to respond predominantly to stimuli by the Conservatives, none of the parties were influenced in their agenda choices by any of the media outlets.

AB - This study provides a first step toward filling a gap in our understanding of the sources of issue salience and of the ability of political actors to manipulate the dimensions of social choice. It investigates how daily issue agendas of political parties and the news media (press and television) affected each other during the 1997 U.K. general election campaign. Using a time-series cross-section design (including data on nine different policy dimensions), ordinary least squares regressions with panel-corrected standard errors show that TV news broadcasts responded systematically to preceding issue selection by both the Labour party and the Conservatives. While the press seemed to respond predominantly to stimuli by the Conservatives, none of the parties were influenced in their agenda choices by any of the media outlets.

KW - general election

KW - media

KW - issue salience

UR - http://hij.sagepub.com/content/7/3/34.full.pdf+html

U2 - 10.1177/1081180X0200700303

DO - 10.1177/1081180X0200700303

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 34

EP - 54

JO - Harvard International Journal of Press-Politics

JF - Harvard International Journal of Press-Politics

SN - 1081-180X

IS - 3

ER -