What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays

David Beattie, Lynne Baillie, Martin Halvey, Rod McCall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is currently a distinct lack of design consideration associated with autonomous vehicles and their impact on human factors. Research has yet to consider fully the impact felt by the driver when he/she is no longer in control of the vehicle [12]. We propose that spatialised auditory feedback could be used to enhance driver awareness to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles. We hypothesise that this feedback will provide drivers with an enhanced sense of control. This paper presents a driving simulator study where 5 separate auditory feedback methods are compared during both autonomous and manual driving scenarios. We found that our spatialised auditory presentation method alerted drivers to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles much more than all other methods and they felt significantly more in control during scenarios containing sound vs. no sound. Finally, that overall workload in autonomous vehicle scenarios was lower compared to manual vehicle scenarios.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationNordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Subtitle of host publicationFun, Fast, Foundational
Place of PublicationNew York, NY.
Pages189-198
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2014
Event8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Helsinki, Finland
Duration: 26 Oct 2014 → …

Conference

Conference8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
CountryFinland
CityHelsinki
Period26/10/14 → …

Fingerprint

Display devices
Feedback
Acoustic waves
Human engineering
Simulators

Keywords

  • user interfaces
  • driver awareness
  • autonomous vehicles
  • in-vehicle spatial auditory displays
  • driving simulators

Cite this

Beattie, D., Baillie, L., Halvey, M., & McCall, R. (2014). What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays. In NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational (pp. 189-198 ). New York, NY.. https://doi.org/10.1145/2639189.2641206
Beattie, David ; Baillie, Lynne ; Halvey, Martin ; McCall, Rod. / What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays. NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational . New York, NY., 2014. pp. 189-198
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Beattie, D, Baillie, L, Halvey, M & McCall, R 2014, What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays. in NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational . New York, NY., pp. 189-198 , 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Helsinki, Finland, 26/10/14. https://doi.org/10.1145/2639189.2641206

What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays. / Beattie, David; Baillie, Lynne; Halvey, Martin; McCall, Rod.

NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational . New York, NY., 2014. p. 189-198 .

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Beattie D, Baillie L, Halvey M, McCall R. What's around the corner? Enhancing driver awareness in autonomous vehicles via in-vehicle spatial auditory displays. In NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational . New York, NY. 2014. p. 189-198 https://doi.org/10.1145/2639189.2641206