What patient assessment skills are required by pharmacists prescribing systemic anti-cancer therapy? A consensus study

Jennifer Allison, Julie Fisher, Caroline Souter, Marion Bennie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In the UK, pharmacist independent prescribers can prescribe for any condition within their clinical competence including systemic anti-cancer therapy. Competency frameworks have been developed but contain little detail on the patient assessment skills pharmacist independent prescribers require to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy with concern in the literature over current training on these skills. Aim: To gain consensus on the patient assessment skills required by pharmacist independent prescribers prescribing systemic anti-cancer therapy for genitourinary cancer (prostate and renal) and lung cancer across National Health Service Scotland. Method: Two phases were performed to generate patient assessment skill consensus. Initially, the Nominal Group Technique was performed within a local cancer network by discussion and participant ranking within genitourinary and lung cancer multi-disciplinary teams. Where consensus was achieved, patient assessment skills were carried forward to try to achieve national (National Health Service Scotland) consensus using a two-round Delphi questionnaire. Results: Of the 27 patient assessment skills, consensus was gained for 21 and 23 patient assessment skills in the genitourinary and lung Nominal Group Technique groups, respectively. Within the genitourinary and lung national groups, 13/21 and 18/23 patient assessment skills were agreed as required for a pharmacist independent prescriber to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy in genitourinary and lung cancer, respectively. Eight common patient assessment skills were identified as core skills. Reasons for not reaching consensus included pharmacist independent prescriber competence, knowledge, skills and the roles and responsibilities of pharmacist independent prescribers within the multi-disciplinary team. Conclusion: We identified the core and specific patient assessment skills required to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy within two tumour groups. Further work is necessary to develop patient assessment skill competency frameworks, training and assessment methods and to redefine the roles of pharmacist independent prescribers within the multi-disciplinary team.

LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice
Early online date1 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 May 2019

Fingerprint

Pharmacists
Consensus
Urogenital Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Therapeutics
National Health Programs
Scotland
Prostatic Neoplasms
Lung
Clinical Competence
Kidney Neoplasms
Mental Competency

Keywords

  • patient assessment skills
  • pharmacist independent prescribing
  • systemic anti-cancer therapy

Cite this

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title = "What patient assessment skills are required by pharmacists prescribing systemic anti-cancer therapy? A consensus study",
abstract = "Background: In the UK, pharmacist independent prescribers can prescribe for any condition within their clinical competence including systemic anti-cancer therapy. Competency frameworks have been developed but contain little detail on the patient assessment skills pharmacist independent prescribers require to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy with concern in the literature over current training on these skills. Aim: To gain consensus on the patient assessment skills required by pharmacist independent prescribers prescribing systemic anti-cancer therapy for genitourinary cancer (prostate and renal) and lung cancer across National Health Service Scotland. Method: Two phases were performed to generate patient assessment skill consensus. Initially, the Nominal Group Technique was performed within a local cancer network by discussion and participant ranking within genitourinary and lung cancer multi-disciplinary teams. Where consensus was achieved, patient assessment skills were carried forward to try to achieve national (National Health Service Scotland) consensus using a two-round Delphi questionnaire. Results: Of the 27 patient assessment skills, consensus was gained for 21 and 23 patient assessment skills in the genitourinary and lung Nominal Group Technique groups, respectively. Within the genitourinary and lung national groups, 13/21 and 18/23 patient assessment skills were agreed as required for a pharmacist independent prescriber to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy in genitourinary and lung cancer, respectively. Eight common patient assessment skills were identified as core skills. Reasons for not reaching consensus included pharmacist independent prescriber competence, knowledge, skills and the roles and responsibilities of pharmacist independent prescribers within the multi-disciplinary team. Conclusion: We identified the core and specific patient assessment skills required to prescribe systemic anti-cancer therapy within two tumour groups. Further work is necessary to develop patient assessment skill competency frameworks, training and assessment methods and to redefine the roles of pharmacist independent prescribers within the multi-disciplinary team.",
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What patient assessment skills are required by pharmacists prescribing systemic anti-cancer therapy? A consensus study. / Allison, Jennifer; Fisher, Julie; Souter, Caroline; Bennie, Marion.

In: Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice, 01.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Fisher, Julie

AU - Souter, Caroline

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