What is postgraduate marketing education for? observations from the UK

E. Centeno, M.J. Harker, E.E.B. Ibrahim, L.W. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - This paper seeks to highlight the significance of the recent debate on the "academic-practitioner divide" for postgraduate marketing education in terms of informing objectives, chosen scope and structure and service provision. Design/methodology/approach - Data were collected on 60 programmes at 45 UK higher education institutions (HEIs) by desk research and from 129 PG students enrolled at five British Universities by means of a questionnaire. Findings - It was found that these were close parallels between PG and UG programmes in the UK. From the perspective of students intending to become marketing practitioners, five key strengths and weaknesses of current marketing education provision were identified. Research limitations/implications - Data on current PG marketing programmes was only collected from a sample of UK HEI's and not internationally. Data from students was collected only from five UK Universities. Practical implications - Suggestions are made for the ways and means by which PG programmes can be enhanced pedagogically and made more relevant to practice. Brief proposals are also made in respect of improving input into programme and class design by current practitioners - especially programme alumni. Originality/value - It is hoped that all sections of this paper will be of value to postgraduate programme leaders in directing, leading and developing their courses strategically and tactically. Keywords Postgraduates, Marketing, Education, SERVQUAL, United Kingdom Paper type Research paper
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-566
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Business Review
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • postgraduates
  • marketing
  • education
  • SERVQUAL
  • United Kingdom

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