What has economics got to do with it? The impact of socioeconomic factors on mental health and the case for collective action

Anna Macintyre, Daniel Ferris , Briana Gonçalves , Neil Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A clear link exists between social and economic inequality and poor mental health. There is a social gradient in mental health, and higher levels of income inequality are linked to higher prevalence of mental illness. Despite this, in the late 20th and early 21st century, psychiatric and psychological perspectives have dominated mental health research and policy, obscuring root socioeconomic contributors. Drawing on contemporary research on the social determinants of mental health, with particular reference to Europe and the U.S., this paper argues that a sharper focus on socioeconomic factors is required in research and policy to address inequalities in mental health. Current attempts to move this direction include: evaluation of the impact of economic policies on mental health, community-based partnerships, increased professional awareness and advocacy on socioeconomic factors. This necessitates greater understanding of the barriers to such actions. This paper argues that advancing ‘upstream’ approaches to population mental health requires an interdisciplinary research vision that supports greater understanding of the role of socioeconomic factors. It also demands collective cross-sectoral action through changes in social and economic policy, as well as economic frameworks that move beyond an exclusive focus on economic growth to embrace collective and societal wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
Article number10
Number of pages5
JournalPalgrave Communications
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2018

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socioeconomic factors
collective behavior
Mental Health
mental health
Economics
economics
Research
Economic Policy
Social Determinants of Health
Economic Development
difference in income
interdisciplinary research
Public Policy
Health Policy
Socioeconomic factors
Mental health
Collective action
Collective Action
mental illness
Psychiatry

Keywords

  • social inequality
  • economic inequality
  • mental health

Cite this

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What has economics got to do with it? The impact of socioeconomic factors on mental health and the case for collective action. / Macintyre, Anna; Ferris , Daniel; Gonçalves , Briana; Quinn, Neil.

In: Palgrave Communications, Vol. 4, 10, 30.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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