What do you think of my ink? Assessing the effects of body art on employment chances

Andrew Timming , Dennis Nickson, Daniel Re, David Perrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using mixed design analysis of variance, this paper examines the effect of body art on job applicant hireability ratings. It employs the literatures on the social psychologies of stigma and prejudice, as well as aesthetic labor, to frame the argument. The results indicate that photos of tattooed and pierced job applicants result in lower hireability ratings compared to the control faces. The negative effect of body art on employment chances is, however, reduced for job applicants seeking non customer facing roles. In customer facing roles, the tattoo is associated with lower hireability ratings than the piercing. The results suggest that visible body art can potentially be a real impediment to employment.
LanguageEnglish
Pages133-149
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Resource Management
Volume56
Issue number1
Early online date20 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Ink
Art
Piercing
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Social Stigma
Social Psychology
Personnel
Esthetics
Analysis of Variance
Rating

Keywords

  • tattoo
  • body art
  • employability
  • human resource management

Cite this

Timming , Andrew ; Nickson, Dennis ; Re, Daniel ; Perrett, David . / What do you think of my ink? Assessing the effects of body art on employment chances. In: Human Resource Management. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 133-149.
@article{de8ef3a5fa1f408cb3b004f5b43ada29,
title = "What do you think of my ink? Assessing the effects of body art on employment chances",
abstract = "Using mixed design analysis of variance, this paper examines the effect of body art on job applicant hireability ratings. It employs the literatures on the social psychologies of stigma and prejudice, as well as aesthetic labor, to frame the argument. The results indicate that photos of tattooed and pierced job applicants result in lower hireability ratings compared to the control faces. The negative effect of body art on employment chances is, however, reduced for job applicants seeking non customer facing roles. In customer facing roles, the tattoo is associated with lower hireability ratings than the piercing. The results suggest that visible body art can potentially be a real impediment to employment.",
keywords = "tattoo, body art, employability, human resource management",
author = "Andrew Timming and Dennis Nickson and Daniel Re and David Perrett",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1002/hrm.21770",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "133--149",
journal = "Human Resource Management",
issn = "0090-4848",
number = "1",

}

What do you think of my ink? Assessing the effects of body art on employment chances. / Timming , Andrew; Nickson, Dennis; Re, Daniel; Perrett, David .

In: Human Resource Management, Vol. 56, No. 1, 31.01.2017, p. 133-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do you think of my ink? Assessing the effects of body art on employment chances

AU - Timming , Andrew

AU - Nickson, Dennis

AU - Re, Daniel

AU - Perrett, David

PY - 2017/1/31

Y1 - 2017/1/31

N2 - Using mixed design analysis of variance, this paper examines the effect of body art on job applicant hireability ratings. It employs the literatures on the social psychologies of stigma and prejudice, as well as aesthetic labor, to frame the argument. The results indicate that photos of tattooed and pierced job applicants result in lower hireability ratings compared to the control faces. The negative effect of body art on employment chances is, however, reduced for job applicants seeking non customer facing roles. In customer facing roles, the tattoo is associated with lower hireability ratings than the piercing. The results suggest that visible body art can potentially be a real impediment to employment.

AB - Using mixed design analysis of variance, this paper examines the effect of body art on job applicant hireability ratings. It employs the literatures on the social psychologies of stigma and prejudice, as well as aesthetic labor, to frame the argument. The results indicate that photos of tattooed and pierced job applicants result in lower hireability ratings compared to the control faces. The negative effect of body art on employment chances is, however, reduced for job applicants seeking non customer facing roles. In customer facing roles, the tattoo is associated with lower hireability ratings than the piercing. The results suggest that visible body art can potentially be a real impediment to employment.

KW - tattoo

KW - body art

KW - employability

KW - human resource management

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hrm.21770/abstract?campaign=woletoc

U2 - 10.1002/hrm.21770

DO - 10.1002/hrm.21770

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 133

EP - 149

JO - Human Resource Management

T2 - Human Resource Management

JF - Human Resource Management

SN - 0090-4848

IS - 1

ER -