What do our school reports really say?

Kirsty L. Turner, Fraser Scott, Andrew Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

School reports are an enduring feature of the education landscape. They form part of our personal history, fondly retained by parents well beyond a child’s school leaving age. The Department for Education requires schools in England to report to parents annually(Department for Education, 2015). There is widespread variation in reporting practice and many schools are doing more than is legally required of them(Power and Clark, 2000).While frequent, data focused reports are commonly used, many schools continue to write comment-based reports as part of their reporting regime. As students move into secondary school, reports of their day to day learning become less forthcoming from the students themselves and reports become one of very few channels of home-school communication.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages4
JournalImpact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 17 May 2019

Fingerprint

school
parents
school education
education
secondary school
student
regime
communication
learning

Keywords

  • school reports
  • school-home communication
  • student workload

Cite this

@article{e17a04a78d0a4551ad2bffec812df7d1,
title = "What do our school reports really say?",
abstract = "School reports are an enduring feature of the education landscape. They form part of our personal history, fondly retained by parents well beyond a child’s school leaving age. The Department for Education requires schools in England to report to parents annually(Department for Education, 2015). There is widespread variation in reporting practice and many schools are doing more than is legally required of them(Power and Clark, 2000).While frequent, data focused reports are commonly used, many schools continue to write comment-based reports as part of their reporting regime. As students move into secondary school, reports of their day to day learning become less forthcoming from the students themselves and reports become one of very few channels of home-school communication.",
keywords = "school reports, school-home communication, student workload",
author = "Turner, {Kirsty L.} and Fraser Scott and Andrew Jackson",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "17",
language = "English",
journal = "Impact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching",
issn = "2514-6955",
number = "6",

}

What do our school reports really say? / Turner, Kirsty L.; Scott, Fraser; Jackson, Andrew.

In: Impact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching, No. 6, 17.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do our school reports really say?

AU - Turner, Kirsty L.

AU - Scott, Fraser

AU - Jackson, Andrew

PY - 2019/5/17

Y1 - 2019/5/17

N2 - School reports are an enduring feature of the education landscape. They form part of our personal history, fondly retained by parents well beyond a child’s school leaving age. The Department for Education requires schools in England to report to parents annually(Department for Education, 2015). There is widespread variation in reporting practice and many schools are doing more than is legally required of them(Power and Clark, 2000).While frequent, data focused reports are commonly used, many schools continue to write comment-based reports as part of their reporting regime. As students move into secondary school, reports of their day to day learning become less forthcoming from the students themselves and reports become one of very few channels of home-school communication.

AB - School reports are an enduring feature of the education landscape. They form part of our personal history, fondly retained by parents well beyond a child’s school leaving age. The Department for Education requires schools in England to report to parents annually(Department for Education, 2015). There is widespread variation in reporting practice and many schools are doing more than is legally required of them(Power and Clark, 2000).While frequent, data focused reports are commonly used, many schools continue to write comment-based reports as part of their reporting regime. As students move into secondary school, reports of their day to day learning become less forthcoming from the students themselves and reports become one of very few channels of home-school communication.

KW - school reports

KW - school-home communication

KW - student workload

UR - https://impact.chartered.college/article/what-do-our-school-reports-really-say/

M3 - Article

JO - Impact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching

T2 - Impact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching

JF - Impact: Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching

SN - 2514-6955

IS - 6

ER -