We can't do it alone: hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement

Sally Paul, Helen Quinn

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Background: Educating and supporting children around death, dying and bereavement, in schools, frequently relies on the individual interest and expertise of staff (Rowland 2003). Moves to develop such work often results in one off projects led by external agencies. Support and education is therefore adhoc and inequitable. A research study was undertaken between a hospice and school to develop practice in this area from a health promotion perspective. This presentation discusses the design and implementation of two practice innovations arising from this process.
    Aim: The innovations aimed to introduce and educate children on issues related to loss and change, whilst simultaneously ensure that school staff have the skills and confidence to support individual experiences within the school setting. This was from a harm reduction and early intervention standpoint.
    Method: Collaborative inquiry, within an action research methodology, was used to advance the innovations. This involved school and hospice staff working together to design and facilitate the activities.
    Results: A programme of activities for children aged 5 to 11 (the resilience project) was designed and integrated throughout the curriculum. This is currently being piloted. A bereavement training programme was designed and facilitated to all school staff. Evaluations reported an increase in confidence around supporting bereavement issues.
    Conclusion: The process highlighted that combing the skills and expertise of hospice and school staff was essential in developing sustainable activities, appropriate to the setting. The role of the hospice in engaging with communities to collaboratively develop education and support around death, dying and bereavement was emphasised.

    Conference

    Conference4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityBristol
    Period11/05/1516/05/15

    Fingerprint

    Bereavement
    Hospices
    Education
    Harm Reduction
    Health Services Research
    Health Promotion
    Curriculum
    Research Design
    Research

    Cite this

    Paul, S., & Quinn, H. (2015). We can't do it alone: hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement. Paper presented at 4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Paul, Sally ; Quinn, Helen. / We can't do it alone : hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement. Paper presented at 4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Bristol, United Kingdom.
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    abstract = "Background: Educating and supporting children around death, dying and bereavement, in schools, frequently relies on the individual interest and expertise of staff (Rowland 2003). Moves to develop such work often results in one off projects led by external agencies. Support and education is therefore adhoc and inequitable. A research study was undertaken between a hospice and school to develop practice in this area from a health promotion perspective. This presentation discusses the design and implementation of two practice innovations arising from this process. Aim: The innovations aimed to introduce and educate children on issues related to loss and change, whilst simultaneously ensure that school staff have the skills and confidence to support individual experiences within the school setting. This was from a harm reduction and early intervention standpoint.Method: Collaborative inquiry, within an action research methodology, was used to advance the innovations. This involved school and hospice staff working together to design and facilitate the activities. Results: A programme of activities for children aged 5 to 11 (the resilience project) was designed and integrated throughout the curriculum. This is currently being piloted. A bereavement training programme was designed and facilitated to all school staff. Evaluations reported an increase in confidence around supporting bereavement issues.Conclusion: The process highlighted that combing the skills and expertise of hospice and school staff was essential in developing sustainable activities, appropriate to the setting. The role of the hospice in engaging with communities to collaboratively develop education and support around death, dying and bereavement was emphasised.",
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    Paul, S & Quinn, H 2015, 'We can't do it alone: hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement' Paper presented at 4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Bristol, United Kingdom, 11/05/15 - 16/05/15, .

    We can't do it alone : hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement. / Paul, Sally; Quinn, Helen.

    2015. Paper presented at 4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Bristol, United Kingdom.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    Paul S, Quinn H. We can't do it alone: hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement. 2015. Paper presented at 4th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Bristol, United Kingdom.