Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

Ann Fenech, Irena Kralj Cigic, Alenka Levart, Lorraine T. Gibson, Gerrit de Bruin, Konstantinos Ntanos, Jana Kolar, May Cassar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.
LanguageEnglish
Pages2067-2073
Number of pages7
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume44
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Volatile Organic Compounds
aldehyde
Aldehydes
repository
volatile organic compound
pollutant
employee
Acetic Acid
acetic acid
Personnel
Furaldehyde
Sampling
Acetaldehyde
acetaldehyde
newspaper
sampling
air
formaldehyde
monitoring
Formaldehyde

Keywords

  • air quality
  • health and safety
  • indoor emission
  • paper degradation

Cite this

Fenech, A., Cigic, I. K., Levart, A., Gibson, L. T., de Bruin, G., Ntanos, K., ... Cassar, M. (2010). Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives. Atmospheric Environment, 44(17), 2067-2073. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021
Fenech, Ann ; Cigic, Irena Kralj ; Levart, Alenka ; Gibson, Lorraine T. ; de Bruin, Gerrit ; Ntanos, Konstantinos ; Kolar, Jana ; Cassar, May. / Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2010 ; Vol. 44, No. 17. pp. 2067-2073.
@article{021a75cfb5404edbb09266ebe5d92040,
title = "Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives",
abstract = "Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.",
keywords = "air quality, health and safety, indoor emission, paper degradation",
author = "Ann Fenech and Cigic, {Irena Kralj} and Alenka Levart and Gibson, {Lorraine T.} and {de Bruin}, Gerrit and Konstantinos Ntanos and Jana Kolar and May Cassar",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "2067--2073",
journal = "Atmospheric Environment",
issn = "1352-2310",
number = "17",

}

Fenech, A, Cigic, IK, Levart, A, Gibson, LT, de Bruin, G, Ntanos, K, Kolar, J & Cassar, M 2010, 'Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives' Atmospheric Environment, vol. 44, no. 17, pp. 2067-2073. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021

Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives. / Fenech, Ann; Cigic, Irena Kralj ; Levart, Alenka; Gibson, Lorraine T.; de Bruin, Gerrit; Ntanos, Konstantinos; Kolar, Jana; Cassar, May.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 44, No. 17, 30.06.2010, p. 2067-2073.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

AU - Fenech, Ann

AU - Cigic, Irena Kralj

AU - Levart, Alenka

AU - Gibson, Lorraine T.

AU - de Bruin, Gerrit

AU - Ntanos, Konstantinos

AU - Kolar, Jana

AU - Cassar, May

PY - 2010/6/30

Y1 - 2010/6/30

N2 - Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

AB - Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

KW - air quality

KW - health and safety

KW - indoor emission

KW - paper degradation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951206327&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021

DO - 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 2067

EP - 2073

JO - Atmospheric Environment

T2 - Atmospheric Environment

JF - Atmospheric Environment

SN - 1352-2310

IS - 17

ER -

Fenech A, Cigic IK, Levart A, Gibson LT, de Bruin G, Ntanos K et al. Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives. Atmospheric Environment. 2010 Jun 30;44(17):2067-2073. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.03.021