Visual feature binding in younger and older adults: encoding and suffix interference effects

Louise A. Brown, Elaine H. Niven, Robert H. Logie, Stephen Rhodes, Richard J. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments investigated younger (18–25 yrs) and older (70–88 yrs) adults’ temporary memory for colour–shape combinations (binding). We focused upon estimating the magnitude of the binding cost for each age group across encoding time (Experiment 1; 900/1500 ms), presentation format (Experiment 2; simultaneous/sequential), and interference (Experiment 3; control/suffix) conditions. In Experiment 1, encoding time did not differentially influence binding in the two age groups. In Experiment 2, younger adults exhibited poorer binding performance with sequential relative to simultaneous presentation, and serial position analyses highlighted a particular age-related difficulty remembering the middle item of a series (for all memory conditions). Experiments 1–3 demonstrated small to medium binding effect sizes in older adults across all encoding conditions, with binding less accurate than shape memory. However, younger adults also displayed negative effects of binding (small to large) in two of the experiments. Even when older adults exhibited a greater suffix interference effect in Experiment 3, this was for all memory types, not just binding. We therefore conclude that there is no consistent evidence for a visual binding deficit in healthy older adults. This relative preservation contrasts with the specific and substantial deficits in visual feature binding found in several recent studies of Alzheimer's disease.
LanguageEnglish
Pages261-275
Number of pages15
JournalMemory
Volume25
Issue number2
Early online date16 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Age Groups
Alzheimer Disease
Color
Costs and Cost Analysis
benzoylprop-ethyl
Encoding
Interference
Experiment

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • memory
  • visual binding

Cite this

Brown, Louise A. ; Niven, Elaine H. ; Logie, Robert H. ; Rhodes, Stephen ; Allen, Richard J. / Visual feature binding in younger and older adults : encoding and suffix interference effects. In: Memory. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 261-275.
@article{7debdf623ace4aa880746d2df88784ec,
title = "Visual feature binding in younger and older adults: encoding and suffix interference effects",
abstract = "Three experiments investigated younger (18–25 yrs) and older (70–88 yrs) adults’ temporary memory for colour–shape combinations (binding). We focused upon estimating the magnitude of the binding cost for each age group across encoding time (Experiment 1; 900/1500 ms), presentation format (Experiment 2; simultaneous/sequential), and interference (Experiment 3; control/suffix) conditions. In Experiment 1, encoding time did not differentially influence binding in the two age groups. In Experiment 2, younger adults exhibited poorer binding performance with sequential relative to simultaneous presentation, and serial position analyses highlighted a particular age-related difficulty remembering the middle item of a series (for all memory conditions). Experiments 1–3 demonstrated small to medium binding effect sizes in older adults across all encoding conditions, with binding less accurate than shape memory. However, younger adults also displayed negative effects of binding (small to large) in two of the experiments. Even when older adults exhibited a greater suffix interference effect in Experiment 3, this was for all memory types, not just binding. We therefore conclude that there is no consistent evidence for a visual binding deficit in healthy older adults. This relative preservation contrasts with the specific and substantial deficits in visual feature binding found in several recent studies of Alzheimer's disease.",
keywords = "Alzheimer’s disease, memory, visual binding",
author = "Brown, {Louise A.} and Niven, {Elaine H.} and Logie, {Robert H.} and Stephen Rhodes and Allen, {Richard J.}",
note = "1. Allen, R. J., Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G. J. (2006). Is the binding of visual features in working memory resource-demanding? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 135, 298–313. doi:10.1037/0096-3445.135.2.298 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 2. Allen, R. J., Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G. J. (2014). Evidence for two attentional components in visual working memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 40, 1499–1509. doi:10.1037/xlm0000002 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 3. Allen, R. J., Brown, L. A., & Niven, E. (2013). Aging and visual feature binding in working memory. In H. St Clair-Thompson (Ed.), Working memory: Developmental differences, component processes, and improvement mechanisms (pp. 83–96). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science. 4. Allen, R. J., Castell{\`a}, J., Ueno, T., Hitch, G. J., & Baddeley, A. D. (2015). What does visual suffix interference tell us about spatial location in working memory? Memory & Cognition, 43, 133–142. doi:10.3758/s13421-014-0448-4 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 5. Allen, R. J., Hitch, G. J., Mate, J., & Baddeley, A. D. (2012). Feature binding and attention in working memory: A resolution of previous contradictory findings. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 2369–2383. doi:10.1080/17470218.2012.687384 [Taylor & Francis Online], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 6. Baddeley, A. D. (2007). Working memory, thought and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. [CrossRef] 7. Baddeley, A. D., Allen, R. J., & Hitch, G. H. (2011). Binding in visual working memory: The role of the episodic buffer. Neuropsychologia, 49, 1393–1400. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.12.042 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 8. Borg, C., Leroy, N., Favre, E., Laurent, B., & Thomas-Ant{\'e}rion, C. (2011). How emotional pictures influence visuospatial binding in short-term memory in ageing and Alzheimer's disease? Brain and Cognition, 76, 20–25. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2011.03.008 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 9. Braver, T. S., & West, R. L. (2008). Working memory, executive control, and aging. In F. I. M. Craik & T. A. Salthouse (Eds.), The handbook of aging and cognition (3rd ed., pp. 311–372). New York, NY: Psychology Press. 10. Brockmole, J. R., & Logie, R. H. (2013). Age-related change in visual working memory: A study of 55,753 participants aged 8 to 75. Frontiers in Perception Science, 4(12). doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00012 [CrossRef] 11. Brockmole, J. R., Parra, M. A., Della Sala, S., & Logie, R. H. (2008). Do binding deficits account for age-related decline in visual working memory? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 543–547. doi:10.3758/PBR.15.3.543 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science {\circledR}] 12. Brown, L. A., & Brockmole, J. R. (2010). The role of attention in binding visual features in working memory: Evidence from cognitive ageing. 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Visual feature binding in younger and older adults : encoding and suffix interference effects. / Brown, Louise A.; Niven, Elaine H.; Logie, Robert H. ; Rhodes, Stephen; Allen, Richard J.

In: Memory, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2017, p. 261-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Visual feature binding in younger and older adults

T2 - Memory

AU - Brown, Louise A.

AU - Niven, Elaine H.

AU - Logie, Robert H.

AU - Rhodes, Stephen

AU - Allen, Richard J.

N1 - 1. Allen, R. J., Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G. J. (2006). Is the binding of visual features in working memory resource-demanding? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 135, 298–313. doi:10.1037/0096-3445.135.2.298 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] 2. Allen, R. J., Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G. J. (2014). Evidence for two attentional components in visual working memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 40, 1499–1509. doi:10.1037/xlm0000002 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] 3. Allen, R. J., Brown, L. A., & Niven, E. (2013). Aging and visual feature binding in working memory. In H. St Clair-Thompson (Ed.), Working memory: Developmental differences, component processes, and improvement mechanisms (pp. 83–96). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science. 4. Allen, R. J., Castellà, J., Ueno, T., Hitch, G. J., & Baddeley, A. D. (2015). What does visual suffix interference tell us about spatial location in working memory? Memory & Cognition, 43, 133–142. doi:10.3758/s13421-014-0448-4 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] 5. Allen, R. J., Hitch, G. J., Mate, J., & Baddeley, A. D. (2012). Feature binding and attention in working memory: A resolution of previous contradictory findings. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 2369–2383. doi:10.1080/17470218.2012.687384 [Taylor & Francis Online], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] 6. Baddeley, A. D. (2007). Working memory, thought and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. [CrossRef] 7. Baddeley, A. D., Allen, R. J., & Hitch, G. H. (2011). Binding in visual working memory: The role of the episodic buffer. Neuropsychologia, 49, 1393–1400. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.12.042 [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] 8. Borg, C., Leroy, N., Favre, E., Laurent, B., & Thomas-Antérion, C. (2011). How emotional pictures influence visuospatial binding in short-term memory in ageing and Alzheimer's disease? 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PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Three experiments investigated younger (18–25 yrs) and older (70–88 yrs) adults’ temporary memory for colour–shape combinations (binding). We focused upon estimating the magnitude of the binding cost for each age group across encoding time (Experiment 1; 900/1500 ms), presentation format (Experiment 2; simultaneous/sequential), and interference (Experiment 3; control/suffix) conditions. In Experiment 1, encoding time did not differentially influence binding in the two age groups. In Experiment 2, younger adults exhibited poorer binding performance with sequential relative to simultaneous presentation, and serial position analyses highlighted a particular age-related difficulty remembering the middle item of a series (for all memory conditions). Experiments 1–3 demonstrated small to medium binding effect sizes in older adults across all encoding conditions, with binding less accurate than shape memory. However, younger adults also displayed negative effects of binding (small to large) in two of the experiments. Even when older adults exhibited a greater suffix interference effect in Experiment 3, this was for all memory types, not just binding. We therefore conclude that there is no consistent evidence for a visual binding deficit in healthy older adults. This relative preservation contrasts with the specific and substantial deficits in visual feature binding found in several recent studies of Alzheimer's disease.

AB - Three experiments investigated younger (18–25 yrs) and older (70–88 yrs) adults’ temporary memory for colour–shape combinations (binding). We focused upon estimating the magnitude of the binding cost for each age group across encoding time (Experiment 1; 900/1500 ms), presentation format (Experiment 2; simultaneous/sequential), and interference (Experiment 3; control/suffix) conditions. In Experiment 1, encoding time did not differentially influence binding in the two age groups. In Experiment 2, younger adults exhibited poorer binding performance with sequential relative to simultaneous presentation, and serial position analyses highlighted a particular age-related difficulty remembering the middle item of a series (for all memory conditions). Experiments 1–3 demonstrated small to medium binding effect sizes in older adults across all encoding conditions, with binding less accurate than shape memory. However, younger adults also displayed negative effects of binding (small to large) in two of the experiments. Even when older adults exhibited a greater suffix interference effect in Experiment 3, this was for all memory types, not just binding. We therefore conclude that there is no consistent evidence for a visual binding deficit in healthy older adults. This relative preservation contrasts with the specific and substantial deficits in visual feature binding found in several recent studies of Alzheimer's disease.

KW - Alzheimer’s disease

KW - memory

KW - visual binding

UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09658211.2016.1156705

U2 - 10.1080/09658211.2016.1156705

DO - 10.1080/09658211.2016.1156705

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 261

EP - 275

JO - Memory

JF - Memory

SN - 0965-8211

IS - 2

ER -