Violent video games in virtual reality

re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences

Graham Wilson, Mark McGill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

2 Citations (Scopus)
22 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Bespoke Virtual Reality (VR) laboratory experiences can be differently affecting than traditional display experiences. With the proliferation of at-home VR headsets, these effects need to be explored in consumer media, to ensure the public are adequately informed. As yet, the organizations responsible for content descrip-tions and age-based ratings of consumer content do not rate VR games differently to those played on TV. This could lead to experiences that are more intense or subconsciously affecting than desired. To test whether VR and non-VR games are differently affecting, and so whether game ratings are appropriate, our research examined how participant (n=16) experience differed when playing the violent horror video game “Resident Evil 7”, viewed from a first-person perspective in PlayStation VR and on a 40” TV. The two formats led to meaningfully different experiences, suggesting that current game ratings may be unsuitable for capturing and conveying VR experiences.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play
Place of PublicationNew York
Pages535-548
Number of pages14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2018
Event2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play - Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 28 Oct 201831 Oct 2018
https://chiplay.acm.org/2018/

Conference

Conference2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play
Abbreviated titleACM CHI PLAY 2018
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period28/10/1831/10/18
Internet address

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Virtual reality
Conveying
Display devices

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • video games
  • violence
  • age ratings

Cite this

Wilson, G., & McGill, M. (2018). Violent video games in virtual reality: re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences. In CHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (pp. 535-548). New York. https://doi.org/10.1145/3242671.3242684
Wilson, Graham ; McGill, Mark. / Violent video games in virtual reality : re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences. CHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play. New York, 2018. pp. 535-548
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Wilson, G & McGill, M 2018, Violent video games in virtual reality: re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences. in CHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play. New York, pp. 535-548, 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Melbourne, Australia, 28/10/18. https://doi.org/10.1145/3242671.3242684

Violent video games in virtual reality : re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences. / Wilson, Graham; McGill, Mark.

CHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play. New York, 2018. p. 535-548.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Wilson G, McGill M. Violent video games in virtual reality: re-evaluating the impact and rating of interactive experiences. In CHI PLAY '18 Proceedings of the 2018 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play. New York. 2018. p. 535-548 https://doi.org/10.1145/3242671.3242684