Utilization of the medical research council evaluation framework in the development of technology for symptom management: the ASyMS©-YG study

Faith Gibson, Susie Aldiss, Rachel M. Taylor, Roma Maguire, Lisa McCann, Meurig Sage, Nora Kearney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Technology is becoming an important medium for supporting patients in health care. However, successful application depends on user acceptability. The Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS©) involves patients reporting cancer chemotherapy-related symptoms using mobile phone technology. Objective: The aim of this article was to report a study of how young people were involved in the development of ASyMS© using the Medical Research Council framework for evaluating complex interventions. Methods: A convenience sample of young people aged 13 to 18 years undergoing cancer chemotherapy were recruited from 2 principal cancer treatment centers in London. Results: In phase 1, young people selected 5 symptoms from an adapted version of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale that were most important to them. In phase 2, young people completed the ASyMS©-YG PDA (personal digital assistant) questionnaire daily on days 1 to 14 of a cycle of chemotherapy and pre/post-use questionnaires. In phase 1, 5 young people chose diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and weight loss as the most important symptoms. In phase 2, 25 young people reported positively to using PDA technology, found ASyMS©-YG simple and easy to complete, and liked that they were monitored at home. In addition to the 5 core symptoms, the ASyMS©-YG reports showed the number (n = 37) of other symptoms young people experienced. CONCLUSIONS:: This early development work indicates the acceptability of ASyMS©-YG and has informed an exploratory trial (phase 3) and randomized controlled trial (stage 4). Implications for practice: This study reaffirms the importance of promoting communication between young people and health professionals.

LanguageEnglish
Pages343-352
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Nursing
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Handheld Computers
Biomedical Research
Technology
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Cell Phones
Symptom Assessment
Constipation
Nausea
Vomiting
Weight Loss
Diarrhea
Randomized Controlled Trials
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • chemotherapy
  • information technology
  • self-care
  • symptom management
  • young people

Cite this

Gibson, Faith ; Aldiss, Susie ; Taylor, Rachel M. ; Maguire, Roma ; McCann, Lisa ; Sage, Meurig ; Kearney, Nora. / Utilization of the medical research council evaluation framework in the development of technology for symptom management : the ASyMS©-YG study. In: Cancer Nursing. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 343-352.
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Utilization of the medical research council evaluation framework in the development of technology for symptom management : the ASyMS©-YG study. / Gibson, Faith; Aldiss, Susie; Taylor, Rachel M.; Maguire, Roma; McCann, Lisa; Sage, Meurig; Kearney, Nora.

In: Cancer Nursing, Vol. 33, No. 5, 30.09.2010, p. 343-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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