Utilising diffractive optics towards a compact, cold atom clock

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

1 Citation (Scopus)
72 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Laser cooled atomic samples have resulted in profound advances in precision metrology [1], however the technology is typically complex and bulky. In recent publications we described a micro-fabricated optical element, that greatly facilitates miniaturisation of ultra-cold atom technology [2], [3], [4], [5]. Portable devices should be feasible with accuracy vastly exceeding that of equivalent room-temperature technology, with a minimal footprint. These laser cooled samples are ideal for atomic clocks. Here we will discuss the implementation of our micro-fabricated diffractive optics towards building a robust, compact cold atom clock.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEuropean Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 2016
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ.
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9781509007202
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2016
EventEuropean Frequency and Time Forum (2016) - University of York, York, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 Apr 20167 Apr 2016
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/mostRecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7470135
http://www.eftf2016.org/

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Frequency and Time Forum (2016)
Abbreviated titleEFTF 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityYork
Period4/04/167/04/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

Diffractive optics
diffractive optics
clocks
Clocks
atomic clocks
Atoms
miniaturization
footprints
metrology
Atomic clocks
lasers
atoms
Lasers
Optical devices
room temperature
Temperature

Keywords

  • quantum technology
  • laser cooling
  • coherent population trapping
  • diffractive optics
  • gratings
  • clocks
  • atomic beams
  • laser beams
  • charge carrier processes
  • atom optics
  • atomic measurements

Cite this

@inproceedings{9a53aa562d6c4820a158f48512a7d003,
title = "Utilising diffractive optics towards a compact, cold atom clock",
abstract = "Laser cooled atomic samples have resulted in profound advances in precision metrology [1], however the technology is typically complex and bulky. In recent publications we described a micro-fabricated optical element, that greatly facilitates miniaturisation of ultra-cold atom technology [2], [3], [4], [5]. Portable devices should be feasible with accuracy vastly exceeding that of equivalent room-temperature technology, with a minimal footprint. These laser cooled samples are ideal for atomic clocks. Here we will discuss the implementation of our micro-fabricated diffractive optics towards building a robust, compact cold atom clock.",
keywords = "quantum technology, laser cooling, coherent population trapping, diffractive optics, gratings, clocks, atomic beams, laser beams, charge carrier processes, atom optics, atomic measurements",
author = "McGilligan, {James P.} and Rachel Elvin and Griffin, {Paul F.} and Erling Riis and Arnold, {Aidan S.}",
note = "{\circledC} 2016 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1109/EFTF.2016.7477809",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781509007202",
booktitle = "European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 2016",
publisher = "IEEE",

}

McGilligan, JP, Elvin, R, Griffin, PF, Riis, E & Arnold, AS 2016, Utilising diffractive optics towards a compact, cold atom clock. in European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 2016. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ., European Frequency and Time Forum (2016), York, United Kingdom, 4/04/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/EFTF.2016.7477809

Utilising diffractive optics towards a compact, cold atom clock. / McGilligan, James P.; Elvin, Rachel; Griffin, Paul F.; Riis, Erling; Arnold, Aidan S.

European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 2016. Piscataway, NJ. : IEEE, 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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