Using systems dynamics models with litigation audiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A litigation process involves many different parties. If models are used to support litigation, then there is a variety of audiences to which the model may be exposed. For example lawyers, members from the plaintiff's and defendant's organisations, expert modellers, arbitrators and judges. This paper discusses the experience of using System Dynamics models to support claims for compensation for time and cost overruns on large and complex projects. In this situation, it is argued that it is vital that the modeller understands how the different audiences will react to the models, otherwise the audience may dismiss the use of the model to support a claim for compensation. This paper discusses the nature of reactions to System Dynamics models by litigation audiences. These reactions highlight issues that the modeller faces when constructing a model. These issues need to be addressed so that the modeller can ensure that the model provides the support required to enable the client to optimise their chances of gaining compensation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-250
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Operational Research
Volume162
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

System Dynamics
Dynamic models
Dynamic Model
Model
System dynamics model
Litigation
Optimise
Costs
Compensation and Redress

Keywords

  • system dynamics
  • model validity
  • litigation
  • project management
  • management theory

Cite this

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title = "Using systems dynamics models with litigation audiences",
abstract = "A litigation process involves many different parties. If models are used to support litigation, then there is a variety of audiences to which the model may be exposed. For example lawyers, members from the plaintiff's and defendant's organisations, expert modellers, arbitrators and judges. This paper discusses the experience of using System Dynamics models to support claims for compensation for time and cost overruns on large and complex projects. In this situation, it is argued that it is vital that the modeller understands how the different audiences will react to the models, otherwise the audience may dismiss the use of the model to support a claim for compensation. This paper discusses the nature of reactions to System Dynamics models by litigation audiences. These reactions highlight issues that the modeller faces when constructing a model. These issues need to be addressed so that the modeller can ensure that the model provides the support required to enable the client to optimise their chances of gaining compensation.",
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Using systems dynamics models with litigation audiences. / Howick, S.M.

In: European Journal of Operational Research, Vol. 162, No. 1, 2005, p. 239-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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