Using a private 5G network to support the international broadcast of the coronation of HM King Charles III

Samuel R. Yoffe, Malcolm R. Brew, Douglas G. Allan, Kenneth W. Barlee, Dani Anderson, Odianosen Ighagbon, Damien Muir, Joshua Goldsmith, Cameron Speirs, Robert W. Stewart, Ian Wagdin, Mark B. Waddell, Purminder Gandhu, Andy Reed, Simon Ashton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Abstract

Wireless cameras for news contribution feeds regularly use “bonded-cellular” devices, which connect to and split the encoded video across multiple public mobile network SIMs. However, in high demand density environments with large crowds, the public networks can quickly become saturated and unable to sustain the necessary bitrates to support high-definition video. To overcome this and provide uncontested wireless connectivity, the largest pop-up 5G standalone non-public (private) network of its type was deployed outside Buckingham Palace and along The Mall to Admiralty Arch to support news contributions for domestic and foreign broadcasters at the Coronation of HM King Charles III, without changing the contribution workflow.

(This paper first appeared in the Proceedings of the 2024 NAB Broadcast Engineering and Information Technology Conference, and is reprinted with permission. https://nabpilot.org/beitc-proceedings/)
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2024 BEIT Conference Proceedings
Place of PublicationWashington, DC
Number of pages15
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • 5G technology
  • standalone non-public networks
  • live broadcasting
  • coronation
  • King Charles III

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