Using a black hole to weigh light: can the Event Horizon Telescope yield new information about the photon rest mass?

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Abstract

It is an exciting time for the study of black holes. The Event Horizon Telescope is due to release the first image of an event horizon, namely that of the black hole Sgr A* at the center of our galaxy (Balick & Brown 1974; Brown 1982). This comes hot on the heels of the first direct detection of a binary black hole merger, using gravitational waves (Abbott et al. 2011).
LanguageEnglish
JournalResearch Notes of the American Astronomical Society
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2019

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event horizon
telescopes
photons
gravitational waves
galaxies

Keywords

  • black holes
  • Event Horizon Telescope
  • galazy research
  • gravitational waves

Cite this

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title = "Using a black hole to weigh light: can the Event Horizon Telescope yield new information about the photon rest mass?",
abstract = "It is an exciting time for the study of black holes. The Event Horizon Telescope is due to release the first image of an event horizon, namely that of the black hole Sgr A* at the center of our galaxy (Balick & Brown 1974; Brown 1982). This comes hot on the heels of the first direct detection of a binary black hole merger, using gravitational waves (Abbott et al. 2011).",
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journal = "Research Notes of the American Astronomical Society",
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