Urban density, accessibility, and proximities: mapping and understanding the relationship between urban densities and cycling accessibility to grocery shops in the 10-minute city in the context of Stavanger metropolitan area

Todor Kesarovski, Fabio Hernández Palacio

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Abstract

Denser urban environments can enable more effective use of resources such as space, energy, and raw materials. Denser cities require less space, preserving valuable peri-urban lands that can provide environmental services and agricultural goods. When organised thoughtfully, compact urban settlements also tend to enhance the accessibility to everyday urban services. Thanks to proximity, cycling and walking, combined with public transport, can replace car-based transportation, reducing the use of fossil fuels and space for road infrastructure. The dimension of time is increasingly used to measure the built environment performance regarding accessibility and proximity. Concepts such as the 5, 10, 15, 20 or 30-minute city are increasingly used in different contexts to study how people access urban spaces in more environmentally friendly and efficient ways. In this paper, we use the concept of the 10-minute city to map the potential of cycling to access groceries in Stavanger metropolitan area. Increasing cycling has become one crucial element of local strategies towards carbon neutrality on national, regional, and metropolitan levels. Local authorities have been improving cycling infrastructure in recent years. However, the low rate of cycling in local mobility suggests that these efforts have not been sufficient. The paper elaborates on a scientific approach based on GIS network analysis. Moreover, the analysis uses correlations with urban densities to explore the empirical relationships and sketch actual potentials regarding the service of interest. As a result, the study quantifies the prospect of cycling to cater sufficiently to the needs of Stavanger MA's population based on the existing morphology and networks. On the other hand, this assumption also provokes some practical considerations regarding the present challenges for cycling to be an effectively employed mobility mode for grocery shopping, such as improving the existing bicycle network and the parking provision for bikes by stores.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual Conference Proceedings of the XXVIII International Seminar on Urban Form
Subtitle of host publication"Urban Form and the Sustainable and Prosperous City"
Place of PublicationGlasgow
Pages810-820
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • urban density
  • 10 minute city
  • morphology
  • accessibility
  • GIS

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