Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder project

J.S. Reilly, S. Stewart, P. Christie, G. Allardice, A. Smith, R. Masterton, I.M. Gould, C. Williams, Scottish Government Health Directorate (Funder)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following recommendations from a Health Technology Assessment (HTA), a prospective cohort study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening of all admissions (N = 29 690) to six acute hospitals in three regions in Scotland indicated that 7.5% of patientswere colonised on admission to hospital. Factors associated with colonisation included re-admission, specialty of admission (highest in nephrology, care of the elderly, dermatology and vascular surgery), increasing age, and the source of admission (care home or other hospital). Three percent of all those who were identified as colonised developed hospital-associated MRSA infection, compared with only 0.1% of those not colonised. Specialtieswith a high rate of colonisation on admission also had higher rates of MRSA infection. Very few patients refused screening (11 patients, 0.03%) or had treatment deferred (14 patients, 0.05%). Several organisational issues were identified, including difficulties in achieving complete uptake of screening (88%) or decolonisation (41%); the latter was largely due to short duration of stay and turnaround time for test results. Patient movement resulted in a decision to decontaminate all positive patients rather than just those in high risk specialties as proposed by the HTA. Issues also included a lack of isolation facilities to manage patients with MRSA. The study raises significant concerns about the contribution of decolonisation to reducing risks in hospital due to short duration of stay, and reinforces the central role of infection control precautions. Further study is required before the HTA model can be re-run and conclusions redrawn on the cost and clinical effectiveness of universal MRSA screening.
LanguageEnglish
Pages35-41
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Dec 2009

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Methicillin
Scotland
Staphylococcus aureus
Biomedical Technology Assessment
Nephrology
Home Care Services
Infection Control
Dermatology
Infection
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Blood Vessels
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • hospital-acquired infection
  • infection control
  • Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • universal screening

Cite this

Reilly, J. S., Stewart, S., Christie, P., Allardice, G., Smith, A., Masterton, R., ... Scottish Government Health Directorate (Funder) (2009). Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder project. Journal of Hospital Infection, 74(1), 35-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2009.08.013
Reilly, J.S. ; Stewart, S. ; Christie, P. ; Allardice, G. ; Smith, A. ; Masterton, R. ; Gould, I.M. ; Williams, C. ; Scottish Government Health Directorate (Funder). / Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus : interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder project. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2009 ; Vol. 74, No. 1. pp. 35-41.
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abstract = "Following recommendations from a Health Technology Assessment (HTA), a prospective cohort study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening of all admissions (N = 29 690) to six acute hospitals in three regions in Scotland indicated that 7.5{\%} of patientswere colonised on admission to hospital. Factors associated with colonisation included re-admission, specialty of admission (highest in nephrology, care of the elderly, dermatology and vascular surgery), increasing age, and the source of admission (care home or other hospital). Three percent of all those who were identified as colonised developed hospital-associated MRSA infection, compared with only 0.1{\%} of those not colonised. Specialtieswith a high rate of colonisation on admission also had higher rates of MRSA infection. Very few patients refused screening (11 patients, 0.03{\%}) or had treatment deferred (14 patients, 0.05{\%}). Several organisational issues were identified, including difficulties in achieving complete uptake of screening (88{\%}) or decolonisation (41{\%}); the latter was largely due to short duration of stay and turnaround time for test results. Patient movement resulted in a decision to decontaminate all positive patients rather than just those in high risk specialties as proposed by the HTA. Issues also included a lack of isolation facilities to manage patients with MRSA. The study raises significant concerns about the contribution of decolonisation to reducing risks in hospital due to short duration of stay, and reinforces the central role of infection control precautions. Further study is required before the HTA model can be re-run and conclusions redrawn on the cost and clinical effectiveness of universal MRSA screening.",
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Reilly, JS, Stewart, S, Christie, P, Allardice, G, Smith, A, Masterton, R, Gould, IM, Williams, C & Scottish Government Health Directorate (Funder) 2009, 'Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder project' Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 74, no. 1, pp. 35-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2009.08.013

Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus : interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder project. / Reilly, J.S.; Stewart, S.; Christie, P.; Allardice, G.; Smith, A.; Masterton, R.; Gould, I.M.; Williams, C.; Scottish Government Health Directorate (Funder).

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 74, No. 1, 03.12.2009, p. 35-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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