Uncivil aviation: a review of the air rage phenomenon

M. Morgan, D.P. Nickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the issue of air rage. Attempting to define and identify the extent of this phenomenon provides the context in which to review contributory factors. The analysis of violence or aggression directed at flight attendants is developed with recourse to the work of Poyner and Warne, who offer a framework for understanding violence to staff. Use of this framework suggests that air rage remains a multifaceted phenomenon, with a number of contributory factors. Identification of a variety of factors is then used to develop an analysis of possible solutions to the air rage phenomenon. These solutions are concerned with controlling the assailant and, more proactively, supporting flight attendants through initiatives such as enhanced training programmes. Finally, the article suggests a number of areas for future research that may add to an understanding of a so-far under investigated phenomenon.
LanguageEnglish
Pages443-457
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Tourism Research
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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air traffic
Aviation
air
violence
flight
Air
recourse
aggression
training program
staff
Factors
analysis
Violence

Keywords

  • aggression
  • air rage
  • tourism research
  • flying

Cite this

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Uncivil aviation: a review of the air rage phenomenon. / Morgan, M.; Nickson, D.P.

In: International Journal of Tourism Research, Vol. 3, No. 6, 2001, p. 443-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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