Turkey, tourism and interpellated ‘westernness': inscribing collective visitor subjectivity

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    That tourism’s representation of places in terms of the clichéd and the banal is a means to overcome consumer uncertainty is surely an unproblematic observation. Nonetheless it invites enquiry into those discourses circulating within the representing culture (the source of tourism demand) constitutive of the subject position that both reassures and is reassured. Turkey is frequently presented to potential consumers in a litany of familiar binaries (West/East, Europe/Asia, Modernity/History etc). A collective gaze is invited in which tourists may conceive of themselves as part of an abstract collectivity, that of interpellated ‘Western-ness’ or ‘European-ness’ continuously reiterating a wondrous encounter with the very idea of the East. In this respect, Turkey is deployed instrumentally as a discursive device, commodifying the self-designation of ‘Western-ness’. Therefore, the occupation of a European subject position in relation to the idea of the East is an ‘attraction’ offered to consumers of tourism in Turkey. Turkey’s position is quite singular in its categorisation as being functionally European, yet also site that articulates, in abstract terms, ‘Europe’s’ self-assigned cultural boundaries. The notion that the Orient exists as a self-confirming object for the West is a commonplace for those familiar with Edward Said’s critique of Orientalism. However, Turkey is utilised as a mechanism for the functioning of that discourse, rather than Orientalised in and of itself. That this occurs within a sphere of popular consumption such as tourism does not diminish its discursive potency in underwriting arbitrary notions of the civilisational patterning of the world.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages444-466
    Number of pages23
    JournalTourism Geographies
    Volume14
    Issue number3
    Early online date25 Nov 2011
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    subjectivity
    Turkey
    tourism
    Tourism
    Orientalism
    modernity
    orientalism
    discourse
    occupation
    tourist
    Subjectivity
    uncertainty
    history
    demand
    Europe
    Discourse

    Keywords

    • interpellation
    • orientalism
    • Turkey
    • Istanbul
    • historicism
    • teleology
    • eurocentrism
    • the other
    • enunciation

    Cite this

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    Turkey, tourism and interpellated ‘westernness' : inscribing collective visitor subjectivity. / Bryce, Derek.

    In: Tourism Geographies, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2012, p. 444-466.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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