Tripeptide emulsifiers

Gary G. Scott, Paul J. McKnight, Tell Tuttle, Rein V. Ulijn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Traditional, surfactant based emulsions have applications in the food, cosmetic, encapsulation and materials industries. The majority of the surfactants that are currently in use are based on lipids that are extracted from natural sources, however, other surfactants, based on polypeptides, copolymers and solid particles (Pickering emulsions)are also used. The process by which traditional amphiphilic surfactants stabilize biphasic mixtures by interfacial assembly and the consequent reduction of surface tension is well understood. Although these surfactants are well-suited to stabilize emulsions, they are not always biocompatible or biodegradable. In addition, they may not have sufficient stability at elevated temperatures or extremes of pH, which can limit their utility in a variety of applications. Therefore, it is desirable to identify a class of surfactants that can be tuned, or tailored, to match the application for which they are used.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalAdvanced Materials
Early online date7 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Dec 2015

Fingerprint

Surface-Active Agents
Surface active agents
Emulsions
Cosmetics
Polypeptides
Encapsulation
Lipids
Surface tension
Copolymers
Peptides
Industry
Temperature

Keywords

  • self assembly
  • tripeptide
  • emulsions
  • computational

Cite this

Scott, Gary G. ; McKnight, Paul J. ; Tuttle, Tell ; Ulijn, Rein V. / Tripeptide emulsifiers. In: Advanced Materials. 2015.
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Tripeptide emulsifiers. / Scott, Gary G.; McKnight, Paul J.; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V.

In: Advanced Materials, 07.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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