Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK

M. Downie, J. Race, P. Seevam

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been receiving increasing recognition as a short to medium term measure for closing the energy gap whilst a portfolio of carbon neutral technologies is developed to provide power for the UK. This has been accompanied by an increasing political will and a developing policy framework to achieve it. If the UK is serious in its intentions, the necessary economic drivers will also be put in place. It remains to identify and resolve the technical issues that apply peculiarly to the UK. In recent years the capture technology has developed to the point of viability and storage has been accepted to be safe and ecologically sound, but relatively little work has been carried out on CO2 transport. In the US naturally occurring CO 2 is routinely transported considerable distances overland through mostly sparsely populated regions for the purpose of enhanced oil recovery. There is also some limited transport of anthropogenic CO2. In the UK a number of suitable offshore CO2 sinks have been identified in the North and Irish Seas for EOR or simply for storage. It has been commonly assumed that the transport of CO2 from UK sources to offshore sinks is straightforward, and may even be able to make widespread use of existing infrastructure. However, there are significant differences between the US experience and the UK transport requirements. The UK will be dealing with anthropogenic CO2, mostly from power plant, which will impose constraints on the hydraulics that have not yet been fully explored. Considerable proportions of the transport system will be subsea, of which there is as yet virtually no experience. There are questions as to the suitability of much of the existing infrastructure and the desirability of using it. There is little experience with multi-source transport systems through densely populated regions. This paper will address some of the technical issues that need to be considered for the development of a UK CO2 transport infrastructure, in the post demonstration phase of carbon capture and storage, capable of mitigating the emission of green house gases whilst allowing the continued use of fossil fuels.

Conference

ConferenceSociety of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAberdeen
Period4/09/077/09/07

Fingerprint

Carbon capture
Fossil fuels
Greenhouse gases
Power plants
Energy gap
Demonstrations
Hydraulics
Acoustic waves
Recovery
Economics
Carbon
Oils

Keywords

  • carbon capture
  • carbon neutral technologies
  • enhanced oil recovery
  • sinks
  • energy policy
  • enhanced recovery
  • greenhouse gases
  • offshore oil fields
  • offshore power plants
  • storage (materials)
  • carbon dioxide

Cite this

Downie, M., Race, J., & Seevam, P. (2007). Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK. 600-607. Paper presented at Society of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
Downie, M. ; Race, J. ; Seevam, P. / Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK. Paper presented at Society of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.8 p.
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Downie, M, Race, J & Seevam, P 2007, 'Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK' Paper presented at Society of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, 4/09/07 - 7/09/07, pp. 600-607.

Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK. / Downie, M.; Race, J.; Seevam, P.

2007. 600-607 Paper presented at Society of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK

AU - Downie, M.

AU - Race, J.

AU - Seevam, P.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been receiving increasing recognition as a short to medium term measure for closing the energy gap whilst a portfolio of carbon neutral technologies is developed to provide power for the UK. This has been accompanied by an increasing political will and a developing policy framework to achieve it. If the UK is serious in its intentions, the necessary economic drivers will also be put in place. It remains to identify and resolve the technical issues that apply peculiarly to the UK. In recent years the capture technology has developed to the point of viability and storage has been accepted to be safe and ecologically sound, but relatively little work has been carried out on CO2 transport. In the US naturally occurring CO 2 is routinely transported considerable distances overland through mostly sparsely populated regions for the purpose of enhanced oil recovery. There is also some limited transport of anthropogenic CO2. In the UK a number of suitable offshore CO2 sinks have been identified in the North and Irish Seas for EOR or simply for storage. It has been commonly assumed that the transport of CO2 from UK sources to offshore sinks is straightforward, and may even be able to make widespread use of existing infrastructure. However, there are significant differences between the US experience and the UK transport requirements. The UK will be dealing with anthropogenic CO2, mostly from power plant, which will impose constraints on the hydraulics that have not yet been fully explored. Considerable proportions of the transport system will be subsea, of which there is as yet virtually no experience. There are questions as to the suitability of much of the existing infrastructure and the desirability of using it. There is little experience with multi-source transport systems through densely populated regions. This paper will address some of the technical issues that need to be considered for the development of a UK CO2 transport infrastructure, in the post demonstration phase of carbon capture and storage, capable of mitigating the emission of green house gases whilst allowing the continued use of fossil fuels.

AB - Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been receiving increasing recognition as a short to medium term measure for closing the energy gap whilst a portfolio of carbon neutral technologies is developed to provide power for the UK. This has been accompanied by an increasing political will and a developing policy framework to achieve it. If the UK is serious in its intentions, the necessary economic drivers will also be put in place. It remains to identify and resolve the technical issues that apply peculiarly to the UK. In recent years the capture technology has developed to the point of viability and storage has been accepted to be safe and ecologically sound, but relatively little work has been carried out on CO2 transport. In the US naturally occurring CO 2 is routinely transported considerable distances overland through mostly sparsely populated regions for the purpose of enhanced oil recovery. There is also some limited transport of anthropogenic CO2. In the UK a number of suitable offshore CO2 sinks have been identified in the North and Irish Seas for EOR or simply for storage. It has been commonly assumed that the transport of CO2 from UK sources to offshore sinks is straightforward, and may even be able to make widespread use of existing infrastructure. However, there are significant differences between the US experience and the UK transport requirements. The UK will be dealing with anthropogenic CO2, mostly from power plant, which will impose constraints on the hydraulics that have not yet been fully explored. Considerable proportions of the transport system will be subsea, of which there is as yet virtually no experience. There are questions as to the suitability of much of the existing infrastructure and the desirability of using it. There is little experience with multi-source transport systems through densely populated regions. This paper will address some of the technical issues that need to be considered for the development of a UK CO2 transport infrastructure, in the post demonstration phase of carbon capture and storage, capable of mitigating the emission of green house gases whilst allowing the continued use of fossil fuels.

KW - carbon capture

KW - carbon neutral technologies

KW - enhanced oil recovery

KW - sinks

KW - energy policy

KW - enhanced recovery

KW - greenhouse gases

KW - offshore oil fields

KW - offshore power plants

KW - storage (materials)

KW - carbon dioxide

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M3 - Paper

SP - 600

EP - 607

ER -

Downie M, Race J, Seevam P. Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage in the UK. 2007. Paper presented at Society of Petroleum Engineers - Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition 2007, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.