Trajectory and spacecraft design for a pole-sitter mission

Matteo Ceriotti, Jeannette Heiligers, Colin McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides a detailed mission analysis and systems design of a pole-sitter mission. It considers a spacecraft that is continuously above either the North or South Pole and, as such, can provide real-time, continuous and hemispherical coverage of the polar regions. Two different propulsion strategies are proposed, which result in a near-term pole-sitter mission using solar electric propulsion and a far-term pole-sitter mission where the electric thruster is hybridized with a solar sail. For both propulsion strategies, minimum propellant pole-sitter orbits are designed. Optimal transfers from Earth to the pole-sitter are designed assuming Soyuz and Ariane 5 launch options, and a controller is shown to be able to maintain the trajectory under unexpected conditions such as injection errors. A detailed mass budget analysis allows for a trade-off between mission lifetime and payload mass capacity, and candidate payloads for a range of applications are investigated. It results that a payload of about 100 kg can operate for approximately 4 years with the solar-electric spacecraft, while the hybrid propulsion technology enables extending the missions up to 7 years. Transfers between north and south pole-sitter orbits are also considered to observe either pole when illuminated by the Sun.
LanguageEnglish
Pages311-326
JournalJournal of Spacecraft and Rockets
Volume51
Issue number1
Early online date11 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

spacecraft design
Spacecraft
Poles
poles
spacecraft
trajectory
Trajectories
trajectories
ice ridge
polar region
trade-off
payloads
Propulsion
propulsion
Orbits
hybrid propulsion
solar electric propulsion
orbits
Electric propulsion
analysis

Keywords

  • trajectory design
  • spacecraft
  • pole-sitter orbits
  • systems design

Cite this

Ceriotti, Matteo ; Heiligers, Jeannette ; McInnes, Colin. / Trajectory and spacecraft design for a pole-sitter mission. In: Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets. 2014 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 311-326.
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Trajectory and spacecraft design for a pole-sitter mission. / Ceriotti, Matteo; Heiligers, Jeannette; McInnes, Colin.

In: Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 311-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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