Toward music-based data discrimination for cybercrime investigations

George R S Weir, Gerry Rossi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Abstract

In this paper we describe an approach to data interpretation in which ‘raw’ data is analysed quantitatively in terms of textual content and the results of this analysis ‘converted’ to music. The purpose of this work is to investigate the viability of projecting complex text-based data, via textual analysis, to a musical rendering as a means for discriminating data sets ‘by ear’. This has the potential of allowing non-domain experts to make distinctions between sets of data based upon their listening skills. We present this work as a research agenda, since it is based upon earlier exploration of the underlying concept of mapping textual analyses to music, and explore possible areas of application in the domains of information security and digital forensics.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCyberforensics
Subtitle of host publicationIssue and Perspectives
EditorsGeorge R. S. Weir
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Pages229-234
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780947649784
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventCyberforensics 2011 - International Conference on Cybercrime, Security and Digital Forensics - University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 27 Jun 201128 Jun 2011

Conference

ConferenceCyberforensics 2011 - International Conference on Cybercrime, Security and Digital Forensics
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period27/06/1128/06/11

Keywords

  • data interpretation
  • textual analysis
  • musical mapping
  • cybercrime
  • digital forensics
  • information security

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  • Cite this

    Weir, G. R. S., & Rossi, G. (2011). Toward music-based data discrimination for cybercrime investigations. In G. R. S. Weir (Ed.), Cyberforensics: Issue and Perspectives (pp. 229-234). University of Strathclyde.