Thinking for two: a case study of speech and language therapists working through assistants

Elspeth McCartney, James Boyle, Susan Bannatyne, Emma Jessiman, Cathy Campbell, Cherry Kelsey, Jennifer Smith, Jane McArthur, Anne O'Hare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many speech and language therapists (SLTs) in the UK work with speech and language therapy assistants, and the numbers of SLT assistants is expected to grow. There has been very little empirical investigation of how SLTs feel about this situation or the effect on working practices of working indirectly. Although respondents could see value in working through assistants, they stressed the time required to do so and the difficulties of adapting and updating therapy plans when working indirectly.
LanguageEnglish
Pages221-235
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Language and Communication Disorders
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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assistant
therapist
Language
language
Language Therapy
Speech Therapy
Thinking
Values
Therapeutics
Therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • service delivery
  • speech and language therapy
  • assistants
  • indirect therapy
  • efficacy research

Cite this

McCartney, Elspeth ; Boyle, James ; Bannatyne, Susan ; Jessiman, Emma ; Campbell, Cathy ; Kelsey, Cherry ; Smith, Jennifer ; McArthur, Jane ; O'Hare, Anne. / Thinking for two: a case study of speech and language therapists working through assistants. In: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 221-235.
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McCartney, E, Boyle, J, Bannatyne, S, Jessiman, E, Campbell, C, Kelsey, C, Smith, J, McArthur, J & O'Hare, A 2005, 'Thinking for two: a case study of speech and language therapists working through assistants' International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 221-235. https://doi.org/10.1080/13682820400016514

Thinking for two: a case study of speech and language therapists working through assistants. / McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Bannatyne, Susan; Jessiman, Emma; Campbell, Cathy; Kelsey, Cherry; Smith, Jennifer; McArthur, Jane; O'Hare, Anne.

In: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, Vol. 40, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 221-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - McArthur, Jane

AU - O'Hare, Anne

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KW - efficacy research

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