'There's a brand new talk, but it's not very clear': can the contemporary EU really be characterized as ordoliberal?

Paul James Cardwell, Holly Snaith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ordoliberalism has undergone a dramatic resurgence as a characterisation of the contemporary EU and its economic dimensions. Commentators have pointed to the ‘ordoliberalisation’ of EU economic policy with Germany at its core, albeit taking the role of a ‘reluctant hegemon’. Perhaps as a result of this pervasive influence, some have claimed that the EU is itself ordoliberal, resting on a particular understanding of the relationship between ordoliberalism and an ‘economic constitution’. For this claim to be substantiated, the characterisation of ordoliberalism needs to persist across time and the EU’s law and policy-making spaces. In this article, we examine this proposition, and argue that the influence of ordoliberalism can help a richer understanding of the contemporary EU beyond the confines of the economic constitution and into its evolving legal system(s).
LanguageEnglish
Pages1053-1069
Number of pages17
JournalJCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies
Volume56
Issue number5
Early online date11 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2018

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Keywords

  • ordoliberalism
  • EU
  • economic policy

Cite this

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'There's a brand new talk, but it's not very clear' : can the contemporary EU really be characterized as ordoliberal? / Cardwell, Paul James; Snaith, Holly.

In: JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 56, No. 5, 31.07.2018, p. 1053-1069.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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