The roof structure of George Heriot's hospital chapel and roof design in Scotland during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The great developments in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century architecture in Scotland corresponded to a gradual development of roof construction techniques and structural arrangements: the challenge was transition from large spans covered by open purlin structures, to large spans covered by shallower roofs carrying heavy plaster ceilings. This chapter investigates the roof structure of George Heriot’s Hospital Chapel in Edinburgh, a seventeenthcentury common rafter roof with later alterations, and compares it with earlier and later examples to discuss the development of Scottish roof structures during the period. It also considers the construction arrangements, the design process and the influence of the timber trade with north-east Europe. Its focus is the roof type made to support a flat ceiling, as distinct from earlier roof forms whose timbers were exposed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Architecture of Scotland, 1660-1750
EditorsLouisa Humm, John Lowrey, Aonghus MacKechnie
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
PublisherEdinburgh University Press
Chapter7
ISBN (Print)9781474455268, 9781474455299, 9781474455282
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • roof design
  • Scotland
  • roof structure
  • seventeenth century
  • eighteenth century

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  • Cite this

    Serafini, A., & González-Longo, C. (2020). The roof structure of George Heriot's hospital chapel and roof design in Scotland during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In L. Humm, J. Lowrey, & A. MacKechnie (Eds.), The Architecture of Scotland, 1660-1750 Edinburgh University Press.