The role of concrete materials in constructing mathematical meaning education 3-13

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The emphasis on concretisation in primary school mathematics is largely derived from orthodox and neo-Piagetian theory. Such theory builds on the constructivist assumptions that mathematical knowledge, like all knowledge, is not directly absorbed by the learner from the teacher but is actively constructed by each individual learner. The realisation that for learning to be effective, it had to be active, manifested itself in a veritable explosion of ‘activity methods’ and ‘learning by doing’ in the belief that unless children were physically acting on concrete materials they could not be learning. But the available evidence suggests that concrete materials have effects on learners which are different from what teachers intended. There is therefore a pressing need to develop pedagogical practices which overtake the limitations of concrete materials and allow mathematical meaning to be constructed.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages31-35
    Number of pages5
    JournalEducation 3-13
    Volume25
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

    Fingerprint

    learning
    education
    teacher
    primary school
    mathematics
    evidence

    Keywords

    • primary education
    • primary mathematics
    • teaching mathematics

    Cite this

    @article{c32fbab7767343dbbbc8ce9a904ae466,
    title = "The role of concrete materials in constructing mathematical meaning education 3-13",
    abstract = "The emphasis on concretisation in primary school mathematics is largely derived from orthodox and neo-Piagetian theory. Such theory builds on the constructivist assumptions that mathematical knowledge, like all knowledge, is not directly absorbed by the learner from the teacher but is actively constructed by each individual learner. The realisation that for learning to be effective, it had to be active, manifested itself in a veritable explosion of ‘activity methods’ and ‘learning by doing’ in the belief that unless children were physically acting on concrete materials they could not be learning. But the available evidence suggests that concrete materials have effects on learners which are different from what teachers intended. There is therefore a pressing need to develop pedagogical practices which overtake the limitations of concrete materials and allow mathematical meaning to be constructed.",
    keywords = "primary education, primary mathematics, teaching mathematics",
    author = "Effie Maclellan",
    year = "1997",
    doi = "10.1080/03004279785200311",
    language = "English",
    volume = "25",
    pages = "31--35",
    journal = "Education 3-13",
    issn = "0300-4279",
    number = "3",

    }

    The role of concrete materials in constructing mathematical meaning education 3-13. / Maclellan, Effie.

    In: Education 3-13, Vol. 25, No. 3, 1997, p. 31-35.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The role of concrete materials in constructing mathematical meaning education 3-13

    AU - Maclellan, Effie

    PY - 1997

    Y1 - 1997

    N2 - The emphasis on concretisation in primary school mathematics is largely derived from orthodox and neo-Piagetian theory. Such theory builds on the constructivist assumptions that mathematical knowledge, like all knowledge, is not directly absorbed by the learner from the teacher but is actively constructed by each individual learner. The realisation that for learning to be effective, it had to be active, manifested itself in a veritable explosion of ‘activity methods’ and ‘learning by doing’ in the belief that unless children were physically acting on concrete materials they could not be learning. But the available evidence suggests that concrete materials have effects on learners which are different from what teachers intended. There is therefore a pressing need to develop pedagogical practices which overtake the limitations of concrete materials and allow mathematical meaning to be constructed.

    AB - The emphasis on concretisation in primary school mathematics is largely derived from orthodox and neo-Piagetian theory. Such theory builds on the constructivist assumptions that mathematical knowledge, like all knowledge, is not directly absorbed by the learner from the teacher but is actively constructed by each individual learner. The realisation that for learning to be effective, it had to be active, manifested itself in a veritable explosion of ‘activity methods’ and ‘learning by doing’ in the belief that unless children were physically acting on concrete materials they could not be learning. But the available evidence suggests that concrete materials have effects on learners which are different from what teachers intended. There is therefore a pressing need to develop pedagogical practices which overtake the limitations of concrete materials and allow mathematical meaning to be constructed.

    KW - primary education

    KW - primary mathematics

    KW - teaching mathematics

    U2 - 10.1080/03004279785200311

    DO - 10.1080/03004279785200311

    M3 - Article

    VL - 25

    SP - 31

    EP - 35

    JO - Education 3-13

    T2 - Education 3-13

    JF - Education 3-13

    SN - 0300-4279

    IS - 3

    ER -