The representation of the professions in the cinema: the case of construction engineers and lawyers

David A. Langford, Peter Robson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper considers how popular culture, especially the cinema, depicts two professions; namely, engineering and the law. It argues that despite the large number of engineers working in the developed economies their lives and their work are seldom portrayed in cinema. In contrast, the legal profession is ubiquitous in its presence in film. The paper seeks to use different forms of analysis, such as culturalism, Marxism, structuralism, feminism and post-modernism when applied to film theory in settings where engineers and lawyers are depicted. The paper makes a distinction between the presentation of the work of engineers and lawyers in 'real life' and cinematic form. The process of engineering in real life is visible yet in cinematic terms it is ignored. In contrast, the legal process is invisible in real life but has high dramatic content in the cinema. When considering the products of the two professions, engineering produces tangible products whilst law produces intangible yet highly cerebral discourses. Yet, in the cinema, the engineering product is a backcloth for other messages where in law the legal product provides a backcloth for a central and dominant message about the legal process. The conclusion is that engineers have to re-engineer themselves to be more visible in society if they are to be regarded as cinematic heroes.
LanguageEnglish
Pages799-807
Number of pages8
JournalConstruction Management and Economics
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Engineers
Cinema
Lawyers
Legal process

Keywords

  • film studeis
  • engineering
  • law
  • fim theory
  • legal process

Cite this

@article{d9918bc1309b4d99a5bb95c4bf7aa5c6,
title = "The representation of the professions in the cinema: the case of construction engineers and lawyers",
abstract = "This paper considers how popular culture, especially the cinema, depicts two professions; namely, engineering and the law. It argues that despite the large number of engineers working in the developed economies their lives and their work are seldom portrayed in cinema. In contrast, the legal profession is ubiquitous in its presence in film. The paper seeks to use different forms of analysis, such as culturalism, Marxism, structuralism, feminism and post-modernism when applied to film theory in settings where engineers and lawyers are depicted. The paper makes a distinction between the presentation of the work of engineers and lawyers in 'real life' and cinematic form. The process of engineering in real life is visible yet in cinematic terms it is ignored. In contrast, the legal process is invisible in real life but has high dramatic content in the cinema. When considering the products of the two professions, engineering produces tangible products whilst law produces intangible yet highly cerebral discourses. Yet, in the cinema, the engineering product is a backcloth for other messages where in law the legal product provides a backcloth for a central and dominant message about the legal process. The conclusion is that engineers have to re-engineer themselves to be more visible in society if they are to be regarded as cinematic heroes.",
keywords = "film studeis, engineering, law, fim theory, legal process",
author = "Langford, {David A.} and Peter Robson",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1080/0144619032000174512",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "799--807",
journal = "Construction Management and Economics",
issn = "0144-6193",
number = "8",

}

The representation of the professions in the cinema: the case of construction engineers and lawyers. / Langford, David A.; Robson, Peter.

In: Construction Management and Economics, Vol. 21, No. 8, 2003, p. 799-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The representation of the professions in the cinema: the case of construction engineers and lawyers

AU - Langford, David A.

AU - Robson, Peter

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - This paper considers how popular culture, especially the cinema, depicts two professions; namely, engineering and the law. It argues that despite the large number of engineers working in the developed economies their lives and their work are seldom portrayed in cinema. In contrast, the legal profession is ubiquitous in its presence in film. The paper seeks to use different forms of analysis, such as culturalism, Marxism, structuralism, feminism and post-modernism when applied to film theory in settings where engineers and lawyers are depicted. The paper makes a distinction between the presentation of the work of engineers and lawyers in 'real life' and cinematic form. The process of engineering in real life is visible yet in cinematic terms it is ignored. In contrast, the legal process is invisible in real life but has high dramatic content in the cinema. When considering the products of the two professions, engineering produces tangible products whilst law produces intangible yet highly cerebral discourses. Yet, in the cinema, the engineering product is a backcloth for other messages where in law the legal product provides a backcloth for a central and dominant message about the legal process. The conclusion is that engineers have to re-engineer themselves to be more visible in society if they are to be regarded as cinematic heroes.

AB - This paper considers how popular culture, especially the cinema, depicts two professions; namely, engineering and the law. It argues that despite the large number of engineers working in the developed economies their lives and their work are seldom portrayed in cinema. In contrast, the legal profession is ubiquitous in its presence in film. The paper seeks to use different forms of analysis, such as culturalism, Marxism, structuralism, feminism and post-modernism when applied to film theory in settings where engineers and lawyers are depicted. The paper makes a distinction between the presentation of the work of engineers and lawyers in 'real life' and cinematic form. The process of engineering in real life is visible yet in cinematic terms it is ignored. In contrast, the legal process is invisible in real life but has high dramatic content in the cinema. When considering the products of the two professions, engineering produces tangible products whilst law produces intangible yet highly cerebral discourses. Yet, in the cinema, the engineering product is a backcloth for other messages where in law the legal product provides a backcloth for a central and dominant message about the legal process. The conclusion is that engineers have to re-engineer themselves to be more visible in society if they are to be regarded as cinematic heroes.

KW - film studeis

KW - engineering

KW - law

KW - fim theory

KW - legal process

UR - http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/openurl.asp?genre=article&eissn=1466-433X&volume=21&issue=8&spage=799

UR - http://openurl.ingenta.com/content?genre=article&issn=0144-6193&volume=21&issue=8&spage=799&epage=807

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144619032000174512

U2 - 10.1080/0144619032000174512

DO - 10.1080/0144619032000174512

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 799

EP - 807

JO - Construction Management and Economics

T2 - Construction Management and Economics

JF - Construction Management and Economics

SN - 0144-6193

IS - 8

ER -