The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Physical activity is important for blood glucose management in people with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Little research has explored the relationship between sedentary behaviour and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective and continuous measurements. Aims: To explore the relationship between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective continuous measurement. Methods: 16 participants with T2D managed with diet, Metformin or DPP4 inhibitors were recruited (mean age 64.1±10.9 yr & BMI 29.4±6.9 kg/m2). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and wore an activPAL accelerometer and FreeStyle Libre continuous glucose monitor for 3-14 days whilst documenting sleep, food and medication. Average proportion of time spent sitting/lying, during the waking day were calculated. Bouts of wake time sedentary behaviour were identified and defined as a period of at least 30 minutes continuous, uninterrupted sitting/lying during the waking day. Correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the relationships between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose, glucose range and glucose coefficient of variation. Results: On average, participants spent 65% of their day sitting/lying, 76% of sedentary bouts were ≥30minutes and 29% of bouts were ≥60minutes. Mean glucose was negatively (r = -0.08, p <0.01) associated with sedentary bout duration. Glucose range (r =0.47, p <0.001) and glucose coefficient of variation (r = 0.26, p <0.001) both positively correlated with sedentary bout duration. Participant characteristics such as age, gender and BMI appear to influence the relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose response. Conclusions: Results indicate increased sedentary time leads to improved mean glucose and increased glucose variability.

Conference

ConferenceAmerican College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting
Abbreviated titleACSM 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period30/05/173/06/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose
Metformin
Blood Glucose
Sleep
Demography
Diet

Keywords

  • diabetes
  • glucose
  • sedentary behaviour

Cite this

McMillan, K. A., Kirk, A., Hewitt, A., & MacRury, S. (2017). The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes. Poster session presented at American College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, United States.
McMillan, Kathryn Anne ; Kirk, Alison ; Hewitt, Allan ; MacRury, Sandra. / The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes. Poster session presented at American College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, United States.1 p.
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McMillan, KA, Kirk, A, Hewitt, A & MacRury, S 2017, 'The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes' American College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, United States, 30/05/17 - 3/06/17, .

The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes. / McMillan, Kathryn Anne; Kirk, Alison; Hewitt, Allan; MacRury, Sandra.

2017. Poster session presented at American College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes

AU - McMillan, Kathryn Anne

AU - Kirk, Alison

AU - Hewitt, Allan

AU - MacRury, Sandra

PY - 2017/5/30

Y1 - 2017/5/30

N2 - Physical activity is important for blood glucose management in people with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Little research has explored the relationship between sedentary behaviour and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective and continuous measurements. Aims: To explore the relationship between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective continuous measurement. Methods: 16 participants with T2D managed with diet, Metformin or DPP4 inhibitors were recruited (mean age 64.1±10.9 yr & BMI 29.4±6.9 kg/m2). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and wore an activPAL accelerometer and FreeStyle Libre continuous glucose monitor for 3-14 days whilst documenting sleep, food and medication. Average proportion of time spent sitting/lying, during the waking day were calculated. Bouts of wake time sedentary behaviour were identified and defined as a period of at least 30 minutes continuous, uninterrupted sitting/lying during the waking day. Correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the relationships between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose, glucose range and glucose coefficient of variation. Results: On average, participants spent 65% of their day sitting/lying, 76% of sedentary bouts were ≥30minutes and 29% of bouts were ≥60minutes. Mean glucose was negatively (r = -0.08, p <0.01) associated with sedentary bout duration. Glucose range (r =0.47, p <0.001) and glucose coefficient of variation (r = 0.26, p <0.001) both positively correlated with sedentary bout duration. Participant characteristics such as age, gender and BMI appear to influence the relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose response. Conclusions: Results indicate increased sedentary time leads to improved mean glucose and increased glucose variability.

AB - Physical activity is important for blood glucose management in people with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Little research has explored the relationship between sedentary behaviour and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective and continuous measurements. Aims: To explore the relationship between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose and glucose variability in people with T2D using objective continuous measurement. Methods: 16 participants with T2D managed with diet, Metformin or DPP4 inhibitors were recruited (mean age 64.1±10.9 yr & BMI 29.4±6.9 kg/m2). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and wore an activPAL accelerometer and FreeStyle Libre continuous glucose monitor for 3-14 days whilst documenting sleep, food and medication. Average proportion of time spent sitting/lying, during the waking day were calculated. Bouts of wake time sedentary behaviour were identified and defined as a period of at least 30 minutes continuous, uninterrupted sitting/lying during the waking day. Correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the relationships between sedentary bout duration and mean glucose, glucose range and glucose coefficient of variation. Results: On average, participants spent 65% of their day sitting/lying, 76% of sedentary bouts were ≥30minutes and 29% of bouts were ≥60minutes. Mean glucose was negatively (r = -0.08, p <0.01) associated with sedentary bout duration. Glucose range (r =0.47, p <0.001) and glucose coefficient of variation (r = 0.26, p <0.001) both positively correlated with sedentary bout duration. Participant characteristics such as age, gender and BMI appear to influence the relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose response. Conclusions: Results indicate increased sedentary time leads to improved mean glucose and increased glucose variability.

KW - diabetes

KW - glucose

KW - sedentary behaviour

UR - http://www.acsm.org/attend-a-meeting/annual-meeting

M3 - Poster

ER -

McMillan KA, Kirk A, Hewitt A, MacRury S. The relationship between sedentary bout duration and glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes. 2017. Poster session presented at American College of Sports Medicine 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, United States.