The politics of MPs pay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How much is an MP worth? Who decides? Throughout the centuries there has been a profusion of partial, uncomfortable, embarrassing and often contradictory answers, but satisfactory and universally acceptable ones still remain undiscovered. That this is so is hardly surprising for such answers rest upon fundamental premises about politics, economics and society: political assumptions about the role and style of the representative and the nature of his workload; economic assumptions about
the comparability of wages and causes of inflation; and societal assumptions
about the relative status and rewards of different occupations. Unless or until agreement is reached upon these elemental matters, then, consensus over the correct remuneration for MPs will continue to elude parliamentarians
LanguageEnglish
Pages59-75
Number of pages16
JournalParliamentary Affairs
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1984

Fingerprint

remuneration
politics
workload
inflation
reward
economics
wage
occupation
cause
Society

Keywords

  • British politics
  • British parliament
  • members of parliament
  • parliamentary wages

Cite this

Judge, David. / The politics of MPs pay. In: Parliamentary Affairs. 1984 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 59-75.
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Judge, D 1984, 'The politics of MPs pay' Parliamentary Affairs, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 59-75.

The politics of MPs pay. / Judge, David.

In: Parliamentary Affairs, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1984, p. 59-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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