The (mis)representation of customer service

S.C. Bolton, M. Houlihan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    86 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The growth of service work has introduced the customer as a third party to the employment relationship. Yet dominant images of customer relations portray docile service workers offering de-personalized care to sometimes aggressive but otherwise not much more agential customers. This paper seeks to bring humanity back into an analysis of customer service, and to reinterpret customer service interaction as a human relationship. Using labour process analysis and data from call-centre workers and their customers, we rerepresent customers as many-faceted, complex and sophisticated social actors and introduce a new conceptual framework of the roles customers play: as mythical sovereigns, functional transactants and moral agents, thereby offering a more accurate representation of customer service and the role of the actors involved in it.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages685-703
    Number of pages18
    JournalWork, Employment and Society
    Volume19
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    customer
    service work
    employment relationship
    Customer service
    Misrepresentation
    worker
    call center
    process analysis
    social actor
    labor
    interaction

    Keywords

    • call centres
    • consumer
    • customer service
    • enterprise culture
    • labour process analysis

    Cite this

    Bolton, S.C. ; Houlihan, M. / The (mis)representation of customer service. In: Work, Employment and Society. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 685-703.
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    The (mis)representation of customer service. / Bolton, S.C.; Houlihan, M.

    In: Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 19, No. 4, 2005, p. 685-703.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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