The longitudinal static stability of an aerodynamically alleviated marine vehicle, a mathematical model

Maurizio Collu, Minoo H. Patel, Florent Trarieux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An assessment of the relative speeds and payload capacities of airborne and waterborne vehicles highlights a gap that can be usefully filled by a new vehicle concept, utilizing both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. A high-speed marine vehicle equipped with aerodynamic surfaces is one such concept. In 1904, Bryan & Williams (Bryan & Williams 1904 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. 73, 100-116 (doi:10.1098/rspl.1904.0017)) published an article on the longitudinal dynamics of aerial gliders, and this approach remains the foundation of all the mathematical models studying the dynamics of airborne vehicles. In 1932, Perring & Glauert (Perring & Glauert 1932 Reports and Memoranda no. 1493) presented a mathematical approach to study the dynamics of seaplanes experiencing the planing effect. From this work, planing theory has developed. The authors propose a unified mathematical model to study the longitudinal stability of a high-speed planing marine vehicle with aerodynamic surfaces. A kinematics framework is developed. Then, taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, the full equations of motion, using a small perturbation assumption, are derived and solved specifically for this concept. This technique reveals a new static stability criterion that can be used to characterize the longitudinal stability of high-speed planing vehicles with aerodynamic surfaces.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1055-1075
Number of pages21
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume466
Issue number2116
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2010

Fingerprint

longitudinal stability
static stability
planing
Aerodynamics
mathematical models
vehicles
Mathematical Model
Mathematical models
aerodynamics
High Speed
aerodynamic forces
high speed
Hydrodynamics
seaplanes
Seaplanes
gliders
hydrodynamics
Hydrostatics
Gliders
Stability Criteria

Keywords

  • aerodynamic alleviation
  • dynamics
  • marine vehicle
  • planing
  • stability
  • wing in ground

Cite this

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The longitudinal static stability of an aerodynamically alleviated marine vehicle, a mathematical model. / Collu, Maurizio; Patel, Minoo H.; Trarieux, Florent.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 466, No. 2116, 08.04.2010, p. 1055-1075.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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