The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system

Fergus McNeill, Simon Halliday, ESRC (Funder)

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper co-authored with Professor Simon Halliday of Strathclyde Law School draws on the findings of a recent ESRC-funded ethnography of social enquiry and sentencing in the Sheriff Courts in Scotland. Drawing on the social theory and sociology of Pierre Bourdieu and on Lipsky's work on street-level bureaucracy, we argue that criminal justice social workers (as street-level bureaucrats) face both 'vertical' and 'horizontal' pressures in seeking to establish and fulfil their professional identities in this field. Moreover, these pressures are often counter-veiling, serving to render criminal justice social workers perennially insecure and marginal in their influence on sentencing. The vertical pressures relate to changes in the penal field which serve to create political and policy imperatives that are, to some extent, at odds with the social workers' habitus. The horizontal pressures relate to the lack of capital (symbolic, cultural and social) which social workers suffer in this field. That said, we also draw on the study's findings to argue both that there are ways of managing these pressures and that the pressures themselves will be reconfigured, offering social workers new opportunities and threats.

Conference

ConferenceESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital
CityGlasgow, United Kingdom
Period30/10/0831/10/08

Fingerprint

social worker
justice
symbolic capital
school law
bureaucracy
ethnography
sociology
university teacher
threat
lack

Keywords

  • social enquiry
  • sentencing
  • Sheriff Courts
  • criminal justice social workers

Cite this

McNeill, F., Halliday, S., & ESRC (Funder) (2008). The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system. Paper presented at ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital, Glasgow, United Kingdom, .
McNeill, Fergus ; Halliday, Simon ; ESRC (Funder). / The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system. Paper presented at ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital, Glasgow, United Kingdom, .
@conference{6c3b6ef0e7cd4ab985dc7e4c783ab366,
title = "The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system",
abstract = "This paper co-authored with Professor Simon Halliday of Strathclyde Law School draws on the findings of a recent ESRC-funded ethnography of social enquiry and sentencing in the Sheriff Courts in Scotland. Drawing on the social theory and sociology of Pierre Bourdieu and on Lipsky's work on street-level bureaucracy, we argue that criminal justice social workers (as street-level bureaucrats) face both 'vertical' and 'horizontal' pressures in seeking to establish and fulfil their professional identities in this field. Moreover, these pressures are often counter-veiling, serving to render criminal justice social workers perennially insecure and marginal in their influence on sentencing. The vertical pressures relate to changes in the penal field which serve to create political and policy imperatives that are, to some extent, at odds with the social workers' habitus. The horizontal pressures relate to the lack of capital (symbolic, cultural and social) which social workers suffer in this field. That said, we also draw on the study's findings to argue both that there are ways of managing these pressures and that the pressures themselves will be reconfigured, offering social workers new opportunities and threats.",
keywords = "social enquiry, sentencing, Sheriff Courts, criminal justice social workers",
author = "Fergus McNeill and Simon Halliday and {ESRC (Funder)}",
note = "Jointly organised by the Universities of Strathclyde, Aberdeen and Glasgow; ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital ; Conference date: 30-10-2008 Through 31-10-2008",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
language = "English",

}

McNeill, F, Halliday, S & ESRC (Funder) 2008, 'The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system' Paper presented at ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 30/10/08 - 31/10/08, .

The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system. / McNeill, Fergus; Halliday, Simon; ESRC (Funder).

2008. Paper presented at ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital, Glasgow, United Kingdom, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system

AU - McNeill, Fergus

AU - Halliday, Simon

AU - ESRC (Funder)

N1 - Jointly organised by the Universities of Strathclyde, Aberdeen and Glasgow

PY - 2008/10

Y1 - 2008/10

N2 - This paper co-authored with Professor Simon Halliday of Strathclyde Law School draws on the findings of a recent ESRC-funded ethnography of social enquiry and sentencing in the Sheriff Courts in Scotland. Drawing on the social theory and sociology of Pierre Bourdieu and on Lipsky's work on street-level bureaucracy, we argue that criminal justice social workers (as street-level bureaucrats) face both 'vertical' and 'horizontal' pressures in seeking to establish and fulfil their professional identities in this field. Moreover, these pressures are often counter-veiling, serving to render criminal justice social workers perennially insecure and marginal in their influence on sentencing. The vertical pressures relate to changes in the penal field which serve to create political and policy imperatives that are, to some extent, at odds with the social workers' habitus. The horizontal pressures relate to the lack of capital (symbolic, cultural and social) which social workers suffer in this field. That said, we also draw on the study's findings to argue both that there are ways of managing these pressures and that the pressures themselves will be reconfigured, offering social workers new opportunities and threats.

AB - This paper co-authored with Professor Simon Halliday of Strathclyde Law School draws on the findings of a recent ESRC-funded ethnography of social enquiry and sentencing in the Sheriff Courts in Scotland. Drawing on the social theory and sociology of Pierre Bourdieu and on Lipsky's work on street-level bureaucracy, we argue that criminal justice social workers (as street-level bureaucrats) face both 'vertical' and 'horizontal' pressures in seeking to establish and fulfil their professional identities in this field. Moreover, these pressures are often counter-veiling, serving to render criminal justice social workers perennially insecure and marginal in their influence on sentencing. The vertical pressures relate to changes in the penal field which serve to create political and policy imperatives that are, to some extent, at odds with the social workers' habitus. The horizontal pressures relate to the lack of capital (symbolic, cultural and social) which social workers suffer in this field. That said, we also draw on the study's findings to argue both that there are ways of managing these pressures and that the pressures themselves will be reconfigured, offering social workers new opportunities and threats.

KW - social enquiry

KW - sentencing

KW - Sheriff Courts

KW - criminal justice social workers

UR - http://www.abdn.ac.uk/education/research/ESRC20082009.shtml

M3 - Paper

ER -

McNeill F, Halliday S, ESRC (Funder). The local rep and the Royal Shakespeare Company: Problems of identity and capital for social workers as actors in the criminal justice system. 2008. Paper presented at ESRC Seminar: The effects of professionals' human and cultural capital for interprofessional social capital, Glasgow, United Kingdom, .