The impact of the economic crisis on media framing: evidence from three elections in Ireland

Eoin O'Malley, Heinz Brandenburg, Roddy Flynn, Ian McMenamin, Kevin Rafter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Media coverage of elections in Europe and North America has increasingly focused on the campaign as a game rather than a policy debate. This is often explained by the changes in media pressures. It may also reflect the narrowing of policy space between left and right and the comparative prosperity enjoyed in Europe and North America. But the relevance of politics varies. The global economic crisis might have led to an increased interest in policy among voters and focus on it by media. Ireland experienced both extremes of boom and crisis between the late 1990s and 2011. The Irish case allows us to test the impact of the crisis on media framing of elections. This article uses original data from the three most recent national elections in Ireland, with a research design that holds other pertinent variables constant. We find empirical support for the theoretical expectation that the context of the election affects the relative focus on campaign or horserace versus substantive policy issues.
LanguageEnglish
Pages407-426
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Political Science Review
Volume6
Issue number3
Early online date22 Oct 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Fingerprint

economic crisis
Ireland
election
Economics
evidence
campaign
prosperity
research planning
coverage
politics

Keywords

  • economic crisis
  • media coverage
  • three elections
  • Ireland

Cite this

O'Malley, Eoin ; Brandenburg, Heinz ; Flynn, Roddy ; McMenamin, Ian ; Rafter, Kevin. / The impact of the economic crisis on media framing : evidence from three elections in Ireland. In: European Political Science Review . 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 407-426.
@article{e99673c908ba4c51a6583903f13d653a,
title = "The impact of the economic crisis on media framing: evidence from three elections in Ireland",
abstract = "Media coverage of elections in Europe and North America has increasingly focused on the campaign as a game rather than a policy debate. This is often explained by the changes in media pressures. It may also reflect the narrowing of policy space between left and right and the comparative prosperity enjoyed in Europe and North America. But the relevance of politics varies. The global economic crisis might have led to an increased interest in policy among voters and focus on it by media. Ireland experienced both extremes of boom and crisis between the late 1990s and 2011. The Irish case allows us to test the impact of the crisis on media framing of elections. This article uses original data from the three most recent national elections in Ireland, with a research design that holds other pertinent variables constant. We find empirical support for the theoretical expectation that the context of the election affects the relative focus on campaign or horserace versus substantive policy issues.",
keywords = "economic crisis , media coverage, three elections, Ireland",
author = "Eoin O'Malley and Heinz Brandenburg and Roddy Flynn and Ian McMenamin and Kevin Rafter",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1017/S1755773913000155",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "407--426",
journal = "European Political Science Review",
issn = "1755-7739",
number = "3",

}

The impact of the economic crisis on media framing : evidence from three elections in Ireland. / O'Malley, Eoin; Brandenburg, Heinz; Flynn, Roddy; McMenamin, Ian; Rafter, Kevin.

In: European Political Science Review , Vol. 6, No. 3, 08.2014, p. 407-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of the economic crisis on media framing

T2 - European Political Science Review

AU - O'Malley, Eoin

AU - Brandenburg, Heinz

AU - Flynn, Roddy

AU - McMenamin, Ian

AU - Rafter, Kevin

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - Media coverage of elections in Europe and North America has increasingly focused on the campaign as a game rather than a policy debate. This is often explained by the changes in media pressures. It may also reflect the narrowing of policy space between left and right and the comparative prosperity enjoyed in Europe and North America. But the relevance of politics varies. The global economic crisis might have led to an increased interest in policy among voters and focus on it by media. Ireland experienced both extremes of boom and crisis between the late 1990s and 2011. The Irish case allows us to test the impact of the crisis on media framing of elections. This article uses original data from the three most recent national elections in Ireland, with a research design that holds other pertinent variables constant. We find empirical support for the theoretical expectation that the context of the election affects the relative focus on campaign or horserace versus substantive policy issues.

AB - Media coverage of elections in Europe and North America has increasingly focused on the campaign as a game rather than a policy debate. This is often explained by the changes in media pressures. It may also reflect the narrowing of policy space between left and right and the comparative prosperity enjoyed in Europe and North America. But the relevance of politics varies. The global economic crisis might have led to an increased interest in policy among voters and focus on it by media. Ireland experienced both extremes of boom and crisis between the late 1990s and 2011. The Irish case allows us to test the impact of the crisis on media framing of elections. This article uses original data from the three most recent national elections in Ireland, with a research design that holds other pertinent variables constant. We find empirical support for the theoretical expectation that the context of the election affects the relative focus on campaign or horserace versus substantive policy issues.

KW - economic crisis

KW - media coverage

KW - three elections

KW - Ireland

U2 - 10.1017/S1755773913000155

DO - 10.1017/S1755773913000155

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 407

EP - 426

JO - European Political Science Review

JF - European Political Science Review

SN - 1755-7739

IS - 3

ER -