The impact of post-fault active power recovery ramp rates of wind turbines on transient stability in Great Britain.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The predominant North-South active power flows across the border between Scotland and England are currently limited by stability considerations. As the penetration of variable-speed wind power plants in Great Britain grows, it is imperative that stability limits, operational flexibility, efficiency and system security are not unnecessarily eroded as a result. The study reported in this paper illustrates the impacts on critical fault clearing times and power transfer limits through this North-South corridor in the presence of increasing levels of wind power plants on the GB transmission system. By focussing on the behaviour of a representative reduced test system following a three-phase fault occurring on one of the two double-circuits of the B6 boundary, the impacts on transient stability margins are qualitatively identified. By altering the immediate post-fault active power recovery ramp-rate of the wind power plants, the transient stability performance of the grid with additional wind power can be significantly improved. The outputs of the project are intended to provide a basis for further detailed studies on a more realistic network model.

Conference

ConferenceEWEA 2015 Annual Event
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period17/11/1520/11/15

Fingerprint

Wind turbines
Wind power
Recovery
Power plants
Security systems
Networks (circuits)

Keywords

  • post-fault
  • active power recovery
  • stability
  • critical fault clearing times
  • power transfer limits
  • ramp-rates
  • wind power

Cite this

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title = "The impact of post-fault active power recovery ramp rates of wind turbines on transient stability in Great Britain.",
abstract = "The predominant North-South active power flows across the border between Scotland and England are currently limited by stability considerations. As the penetration of variable-speed wind power plants in Great Britain grows, it is imperative that stability limits, operational flexibility, efficiency and system security are not unnecessarily eroded as a result. The study reported in this paper illustrates the impacts on critical fault clearing times and power transfer limits through this North-South corridor in the presence of increasing levels of wind power plants on the GB transmission system. By focussing on the behaviour of a representative reduced test system following a three-phase fault occurring on one of the two double-circuits of the B6 boundary, the impacts on transient stability margins are qualitatively identified. By altering the immediate post-fault active power recovery ramp-rate of the wind power plants, the transient stability performance of the grid with additional wind power can be significantly improved. The outputs of the project are intended to provide a basis for further detailed studies on a more realistic network model.",
keywords = "post-fault, active power recovery, stability, critical fault clearing times, power transfer limits, ramp-rates, wind power",
author = "Kevin Johnstone and Keith Bell and Campbell Booth",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "17",
language = "English",
note = "EWEA 2015 Annual Event ; Conference date: 17-11-2015 Through 20-11-2015",

}

The impact of post-fault active power recovery ramp rates of wind turbines on transient stability in Great Britain. / Johnstone, Kevin; Bell, Keith; Booth, Campbell.

2015. Paper presented at EWEA 2015 Annual Event, Paris, France.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - The impact of post-fault active power recovery ramp rates of wind turbines on transient stability in Great Britain.

AU - Johnstone, Kevin

AU - Bell, Keith

AU - Booth, Campbell

PY - 2015/11/17

Y1 - 2015/11/17

N2 - The predominant North-South active power flows across the border between Scotland and England are currently limited by stability considerations. As the penetration of variable-speed wind power plants in Great Britain grows, it is imperative that stability limits, operational flexibility, efficiency and system security are not unnecessarily eroded as a result. The study reported in this paper illustrates the impacts on critical fault clearing times and power transfer limits through this North-South corridor in the presence of increasing levels of wind power plants on the GB transmission system. By focussing on the behaviour of a representative reduced test system following a three-phase fault occurring on one of the two double-circuits of the B6 boundary, the impacts on transient stability margins are qualitatively identified. By altering the immediate post-fault active power recovery ramp-rate of the wind power plants, the transient stability performance of the grid with additional wind power can be significantly improved. The outputs of the project are intended to provide a basis for further detailed studies on a more realistic network model.

AB - The predominant North-South active power flows across the border between Scotland and England are currently limited by stability considerations. As the penetration of variable-speed wind power plants in Great Britain grows, it is imperative that stability limits, operational flexibility, efficiency and system security are not unnecessarily eroded as a result. The study reported in this paper illustrates the impacts on critical fault clearing times and power transfer limits through this North-South corridor in the presence of increasing levels of wind power plants on the GB transmission system. By focussing on the behaviour of a representative reduced test system following a three-phase fault occurring on one of the two double-circuits of the B6 boundary, the impacts on transient stability margins are qualitatively identified. By altering the immediate post-fault active power recovery ramp-rate of the wind power plants, the transient stability performance of the grid with additional wind power can be significantly improved. The outputs of the project are intended to provide a basis for further detailed studies on a more realistic network model.

KW - post-fault

KW - active power recovery

KW - stability

KW - critical fault clearing times

KW - power transfer limits

KW - ramp-rates

KW - wind power

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