The impact of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal form

S.C. Wearing, E.M. Hennig, N.M. Byrne, J.R. Steele, A.P. Hills

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    110 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite the greater prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in obese adults, the consequences of childhood obesity on the development and function of the musculoskeletal system have received comparatively little attention within the literature. Of the limited number of studies performed to date, the majority have focused on the impact of childhood obesity on skeletal structure and alignment, and to a lesser extent its influence on clinical tests of motor performance including muscular strength, balance and locomotion. Although collectively these studies imply that the functional and structural limitations imposed by obesity may result in aberrant lower limb mechanics and the potential for musculoskeletal injury, empirical verification is currently lacking. The delineation of the effects of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal structure in terms of mass, adiposity, anthropometry, metabolic effects and physical inactivity, or their combination, has not been established. More specifically, there is a lack of research regarding the effect of childhood obesity on the properties of connective tissue structures, such as tendons and ligaments. Given the global increase in childhood obesity, there is a need to ascertain the consequences of persistent obesity on musculoskeletal structure and function. A better understanding of the implications of childhood obesity on the development and function of the musculoskeletal system would assist in the provision of more meaningful support in the prevention, treatment and management of the musculoskeletal consequences of the condition.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages209-218
    Number of pages9
    JournalObesity Reviews
    Volume7
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Pediatric Obesity
    Musculoskeletal Development
    Obesity
    Anthropometry
    Adiposity
    Locomotion
    Mechanics
    Ligaments
    Tendons
    Connective Tissue
    Lower Extremity
    Wounds and Injuries
    Research

    Keywords

    • biomechanics
    • motor performance
    • obesity
    • kinetics
    • childhood obesity

    Cite this

    Wearing, S. C., Hennig, E. M., Byrne, N. M., Steele, J. R., & Hills, A. P. (2006). The impact of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal form. Obesity Reviews, 7(2), 209-218. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2006.00216.x
    Wearing, S.C. ; Hennig, E.M. ; Byrne, N.M. ; Steele, J.R. ; Hills, A.P. / The impact of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal form. In: Obesity Reviews. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 209-218.
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    Wearing, SC, Hennig, EM, Byrne, NM, Steele, JR & Hills, AP 2006, 'The impact of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal form' Obesity Reviews, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 209-218. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2006.00216.x

    The impact of childhood obesity on musculoskeletal form. / Wearing, S.C.; Hennig, E.M.; Byrne, N.M.; Steele, J.R.; Hills, A.P.

    In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2006, p. 209-218.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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