The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host

J. Alexander, C. W. Roberts, W. Walker, G. Reichmann, C. A. Hunter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most common parasites of humans, with clinical toxoplasmosis constituting a major risk to immuno-compromised individuals, pregnant women and unborn children [1]. T. gondii infection is common in most war en blooded vertebrates and infects approximately 15–80% of the world’s human population depending on ethnicity or geographical location [2]. The sexual stage of the life cycle takes place in the intestine of the definitive host, the cat. Transmission to the intermediate host can occur in several ways — ingestion of infective sporulated oocysts released in cat faeces, or by the ingestion of meat containing the long-lived tissue cyst stage which allows direct transmission from one intermediate host to another. Vertical transmission results in congenital infection or more unusually, infection can be acquired as a result of receiving transplants from infected individuals or occasionally as a result of a laboratory accident.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationCongenital Toxoplasmosis
Subtitle of host publicationScientific Background, Clinical Management and Control
EditorsPierre Ambroise-Thomas, Eskild Peterson
Place of PublicationParis
PublisherSpringer
Pages69-82
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)228759664X, 9782287596643, 9782817808475
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2000

Fingerprint

Toxoplasmosis
Allergy and Immunology
Parasites
Cats
Eating
Oocysts
Toxoplasma
Infection
Life Cycle Stages
Feces
Meat
Intestines
Accidents
Vertebrates
Cysts
Pregnant Women
Transplants
Population
Warfare

Keywords

  • Toxoplasma gondii
  • parasite
  • clinical toxoplasmosis

Cite this

Alexander, J., Roberts, C. W., Walker, W., Reichmann, G., & Hunter, C. A. (2000). The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host. In P. Ambroise-Thomas, & E. Peterson (Eds.), Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Scientific Background, Clinical Management and Control (pp. 69-82). Paris: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-2-8178-0847-5_5
Alexander, J. ; Roberts, C. W. ; Walker, W. ; Reichmann, G. ; Hunter, C. A. / The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host. Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Scientific Background, Clinical Management and Control. editor / Pierre Ambroise-Thomas ; Eskild Peterson. Paris : Springer, 2000. pp. 69-82
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Alexander, J, Roberts, CW, Walker, W, Reichmann, G & Hunter, CA 2000, The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host. in P Ambroise-Thomas & E Peterson (eds), Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Scientific Background, Clinical Management and Control. Springer, Paris, pp. 69-82. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-2-8178-0847-5_5

The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host. / Alexander, J.; Roberts, C. W.; Walker, W.; Reichmann, G.; Hunter, C. A.

Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Scientific Background, Clinical Management and Control. ed. / Pierre Ambroise-Thomas; Eskild Peterson. Paris : Springer, 2000. p. 69-82.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Alexander J, Roberts CW, Walker W, Reichmann G, Hunter CA. The immunology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the immune-competent host. In Ambroise-Thomas P, Peterson E, editors, Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Scientific Background, Clinical Management and Control. Paris: Springer. 2000. p. 69-82 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-2-8178-0847-5_5