The experience of work in India's domestic call centre industry

Phil Taylor, Premilla D'Cruz, Ernesto Noronha, Dora Scholarios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on Indian call centres has focused almost exclusively on international-facing operations, at the expense of its domestic sub-sector, which is driven by different economic dynamics, namely the expanding Indian ‘new economy’ and the growth of discretionary spending by the country's new middle class. The paper breaks new ground with its detailed examination of the experience of work in this domestic sector and draws upon extensive employee survey and interview data. The findings demonstrate that Indian domestic work lies at the extreme quantitative end of the call centre spectrum – its employees subject to tight controls, extensive work hours and authoritarian management practices in common.
LanguageEnglish
Pages436-452
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume24
Issue number2
Early online date1 Jun 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Personnel
Facings
Industry
Economics
India
Call centres
Employees
International operations
Economic dynamics
Work hours
Expenses
Management practices
New economy
Middle class

Keywords

  • call centre employment
  • indian call centres
  • call centre work
  • indian economy
  • india
  • call centres
  • work intensity
  • labour process
  • work organisation

Cite this

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The experience of work in India's domestic call centre industry. / Taylor, Phil; D'Cruz, Premilla; Noronha, Ernesto; Scholarios, Dora.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.2013, p. 436-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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