The ethics of Islamic leadership: a cross-cultural approach for public administration

E. El Kaleh, E. A. Samier

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper proposes bridging the gap between Muslims' espoused and practiced values by teaching Islamic work ethics and Islamic leadership in administration and leadership professional programs. The argument for this is constructed in four stages: an overview of Islamic principles for building a good community; proposing a leadership model from an Islamic perspective that builds on the work of other management and administration scholars; a response to many scholars who have called for balancing Islamic religious values with Western leadership practices and scholarship by comparing the principles of Islamic leadership with servant and transformational theories of leadership, and public sector traditional values, all of which are close valuationally to Islamic conceptions; and the importance of teaching Islamic ethics, using national case studies and biographical materials of great Muslim leaders, as well as the Arabic 'mirror of princes' tradition, as teaching pedagogies. An important feature of Islamic and Arab literature relevant to this discussion is that it spans many centuries, has been contributed to from many countries, it is not unitary, consisting of a lively set of traditions, interpretive schools, debates, disagreements, and controversies that are often lost in the discussion of this intellectual heritage.

LanguageEnglish
Pages188-211
Number of pages24
JournalHalduskultuur
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

public administration
moral philosophy
leadership
Muslim
Teaching
Values
servants
public sector
leader
management
school
community

Keywords

  • Islamic leadership
  • Islamic work ethics
  • public administration ethics

Cite this

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The ethics of Islamic leadership : a cross-cultural approach for public administration. / El Kaleh, E.; Samier, E. A.

In: Halduskultuur, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2013, p. 188-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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