The efficacy of cognitive prosthetic technology for people with memory impairments: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Matthew Jamieson, Breda Cullen, Marilyn McGee-Lennon, Stephen Brewster, Jonathan J. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Technology can compensate for memory impairment. The efficacy of assistive technology for people with memory difficulties and the methodology of selected studies are assessed. A systematic search was performed and all studies that investigated the impact of technology on memory performance for adults with impaired memory resulting from acquired brain injury (ABI) or a degenerative disease were included. Two 10-point scales were used to compare each study to an ideally reported single case experimental design (SCED) study (SCED scale; Tate et al., 2008) or randomised control group study (PEDro-P scale; Maher, Sherrington, Herbert, Moseley, & Elkins, 2003). Thirty-two SCED (mean = 5.9 on the SCED scale) and 11 group studies (mean = 4.45 on the PEDro-P scale) were found. Baseline and intervention performance for each participant in the SCED studies was re-calculated using non-overlap of all pairs (Parker & Vannest, 2009) giving a mean score of 0.85 on a 0 to 1 scale (17 studies, n = 36). A meta-analysis of the efficacy of technology vs. control in seven group studies gave a large effect size (d = 1.27) (n = 147). It was concluded that prosthetic technology can improve performance on everyday tasks requiring memory. There is a specific need for investigations of technology for people with degenerative diseases.
LanguageEnglish
Pages419-444
Number of pages26
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number3-4
Early online date19 Aug 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2014

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Meta-Analysis
Research Design
Technology
Self-Help Devices
Brain Injuries
Systematic Review
Meta-analysis
Impairment
Efficacy
Prosthetics
Control Groups
Experimental Design

Keywords

  • memory aid
  • assistive technology
  • memory impairment
  • cognitive rehabilitation
  • brain injury
  • degenerative disease

Cite this

Jamieson, Matthew ; Cullen, Breda ; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn ; Brewster, Stephen ; Evans, Jonathan J. / The efficacy of cognitive prosthetic technology for people with memory impairments : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 3-4. pp. 419-444.
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The efficacy of cognitive prosthetic technology for people with memory impairments : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Jamieson, Matthew; Cullen, Breda; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Brewster, Stephen; Evans, Jonathan J.

In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Vol. 24, No. 3-4, 04.07.2014, p. 419-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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