The efficacy of acoustic-based articulatory phenotyping for characterizing and classifying four divergent neurodegenerative diseases using sequential motion rates

Hannah P. Rowe, Perman Gochyyev, Adam C. Lammert, Anja Lowit, Kristie A. Spencer, Bradford C. Dickerson, James D. Berry, Jordan R. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite the impacts of neurodegeneration on speech function, little is known about how to comprehensively characterize the resulting speech abnormalities using a set of objective measures. Quantitative phenotyping of speech motor impairments may have important implications for identifying clinical syndromes and their underlying etiologies, monitoring disease progression over time, and improving treatment efficacy. The goal of this research was to investigate the validity and classification accuracy of comprehensive acoustic-based articulatory phenotypes in speakers with distinct neurodegenerative diseases. Articulatory phenotypes were characterized based on acoustic features that were selected to represent five components of motor performance: Coordination, Consistency, Speed, Precision, and Rate. The phenotypes were first used to characterize the articulatory abnormalities across four progressive neurologic diseases known to have divergent speech motor deficits: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive ataxia (PA), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia and progressive apraxia of speech (nfPPA + PAOS). We then examined the efficacy of articulatory phenotyping for disease classification. Acoustic analyses were conducted on audio recordings of 217 participants (i.e., 46 ALS, 52 PA, 60 PD, 20 nfPPA + PAOS, and 39 controls) during a sequential speech task. Results revealed evidence of distinct articulatory phenotypes for the four clinical groups and that the phenotypes demonstrated strong classification accuracy for all groups except ALS. Our results highlight the phenotypic variability present across neurodegenerative diseases, which, in turn, may inform (1) the differential diagnosis of neurological diseases and (2) the development of sensitive outcome measures for monitoring disease progression or assessing treatment efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1487-1511
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume129
Issue number12
Early online date28 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • acoustic analyses
  • domain knowledge
  • articulatory features
  • neurodegenerative disease
  • differential diagnosis

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