The effect of thermal stimuli on the emotional perception of images

Moses Akazue, Martin Halvey, Lynne Baillie, Stephen Brewster

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

11 Citations (Scopus)
474 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Thermal stimulation is a feedback channel that has the potential to influence the emotional response of people to media such as images. While previous work has demonstrated that thermal stimuli might have an effect on the emotional perception of images, little is understood about the exact emotional responses different thermal properties and presentation techniques can elicit towards images. This paper presents two user studies that investigate the effect thermal stimuli parameters (e.g. intensity) and timing of thermal stimuli presentation have on the emotional perception of images. We found that thermal stimulation increased valence and arousal in images with low valence and neutral to low arousal. Thermal augmentation of images also reduced valence and arousal in high valence and arousal images. We discovered that depending on when thermal augmentation is presented, it can either be used to create anticipation or enhance the inherent emotion an image is capable of evoking.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationCHI '16
Place of PublicationNew York
Pages4401-4412
Number of pages12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 May 2016
Event34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (ACM CHI) - California, San Jose, United States
Duration: 7 May 201612 May 2016

Conference

Conference34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (ACM CHI)
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period7/05/1612/05/16

Keywords

  • thermal stimuli
  • stimulation
  • emotion
  • visual
  • valence
  • arousal
  • dominance
  • thermal feedback
  • picture emoticon categories

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of thermal stimuli on the emotional perception of images'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this